Which books are most highly recommended?

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BT Beekeeper

New Bee
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
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Location
West Devon
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
2 on double brood boxes
With Christmas looming once again I wonder which books are most current and would be recommended for a beekeeper of many years experience at the 2 or 3 hive level who is now wanting to update his knowledge and is considering an increase to half a dozen hives or so, rearing queens on a small scale, making up nucs, showing honey and other products etc. I also enjoy reading generally about all things to do with bees and honey, beekeeping experiences, anecdotes etc.

The reference books I have at present are Ted Hooper's Guide to Bees and Honey, A Manual of Beekeeping (Wedmore), Principles of Practical Beekeeping (Couston), The Bee Craftsman (Wadey). All are pretty ancient and about 30 years behind the times (except Hooper's).

It would be good to know which books other members find enjoyable and most useful? Any feedback will be much appreciated.

Happy Christmas,
John
 
try the Rose Hive Method - Tim Rowe - a good and thoughtful challenge to the Hoopers... even if you don't fancy going for the one size box he advocates its an interesting read - especially his views of swarm control
now I stand back and wait for the dingbats! :)
 
2 I would add are :-

Practical Beekeeping by Clive de Bruyn

Sixty Years with Bees by Donald Sims
 
I enjoyed this one:
Honey by the Ton, by Oliver Field

Not a beekeeping manual but good to read.
 
Bees at the bottom of the garden by Alan Campion, most useful book I have.
Cheers
S

I'm surprised, I borrowed it and thought it very much a 'first' book. Currently reading Ron Brown's 'Beekeeping- a seasonal guide', much more in depth but still very readable.

Enjoyed 'Honey by the ton' as well.
 
A Practical Manual of Beekeeping: How to Keep Bees and Develop Your Full Potential as an Apiarist by David Cramp.

Not as dry as de Bruyn (which is neverthless excellent).
 
I'm surprised, I borrowed it and thought it very much a 'first' book. Currently reading Ron Brown's 'Beekeeping- a seasonal guide', much more in depth but still very readable.

Enjoyed 'Honey by the ton' as well.

Not sure why you are surprised, might be a 'first' book but is very useful and the one I 'dip' into when needed? If I had to choose one book this would be the one, tells you everything you need.
Cheers
S
 
Any book give hive measurement especially National Hive measurements
 
The initial books mentioned are all good books, They may not mention Varroa, but as that situation is changing quite fast, and here I am not going to list the different controls that have come and gone whilst all being promoted as the latest and greatest, I would with the reservation it is American orientated suggest Steve Taber, Super Bees.

I just browsed my library and thought hmm maybe this one, but no, and maybe that one but no, as none of them would in the one book achieve what is being asked.

I would suggest browsing the catalogue of Northern Bee books and deciding from that.

http://www.groovycart.co.uk/cart.php?c=533

PH
 
Th ornes catalogue page 11 is also useful.

The pdf is good but it gives an incorrect size for the Modified Dadant which is actually 20" x 18 and a half " and houses 11 frames

The Langstroth Jumbo is 20" x 16 and a quarter " and houses 10 frames
 
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Not sure why you are surprised, might be a 'first' book but is very useful and the one I 'dip' into when needed? If I had to choose one book this would be the one, tells you everything you need.
Cheers
S

Nothing against it, just thought that with 15 hives you would be reaching for something more technical- I thought it particularly light on queen replacement, which with that number of colonies must be something of an undertaking in itself

Maybe (probably!) you don't have as much to learn on that front as I do!
 
"Bees at the bottom of the garden, as Stiffy said, is a good read but BT-beekeeper said he had "many years of experience". I do not think this book would have that much to offer him. I reckon that, for him, David Cramp's book would be a better bet- it encompasses everyone from first year hobbyists to pro's managing hundreds of hives.


Ben P

Dammit! Cross-posted with Skyhook again!
 
I agree that Bees at the bottom of the Garden is to my mind pretty much a very junior beginners book and certainly not one I would be pleased to receive.

PH
 
The pdf is good but it gives an incorrect size for the Modified Dadant which is actually 20" x 18 and a half " and houses 11 frames

The Langstroth Jumbo is 20" x 16 and a quarter " and houses 10 frames
Ahhhhhh thanks for that
 
I like David Cramp's writing style but it's an international book, not UK specific.
 
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One of my favourites is still Practical Beekeeping by Clive de Bruyn.

However a really useful little book is Teach Yourself Beekeeping by Adrian and Claire Waring. Light on pretty pictures but really has a wealth of information if you take the time to read it.

Marc
 
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