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BeeKeyPlayer

From Rainham, Medway (North Kent) UK
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Location
Rainham, Medway (North Kent) UK
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National
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24 plus 12 owned by others
I've read here that thymol can help control nosema (I forget which one). I've just come across a suggestion that oxalic acid can help control chalkbrood. Is that real, or just a positive consequence of controlling mite numbers?

I don't (think I) have chalkbrood in my hives. Maybe I'm not spotting it, or maybe it's because I do my best to control varroa, or maybe it's a direct result of using oxalic acid.
 
I've read here that thymol can help control nosema (I forget which one). I've just come across a suggestion that oxalic acid can help control chalkbrood. Is that real, or just a positive consequence of controlling mite numbers?

I don't (think I) have chalkbrood in my hives. Maybe I'm not spotting it, or maybe it's because I do my best to control varroa, or maybe it's a direct result of using oxalic acid.
Chalkbrood is the number one disease of bees in Australia and we don't use OA...never having had the mite. Sounds like a possible connection?
 
I've read here that thymol can help control nosema (I forget which one). I've just come across a suggestion that oxalic acid can help control chalkbrood. Is that real, or just a positive consequence of controlling mite numbers
(Damed if I can find the study to quote it) however I recall a study that evaluated ApiHerb and Api-Bioxal as treatments against N. ceranae.showing promising results; but further studies were needed to clarify the way oxalic acid as well as the compounds in ApiHerb worked against N. ceranae.
Never seen mention of chalk brood though
 
(Damed if I can find the study to quote it) however I recall a study that evaluated ApiHerb and Api-Bioxal as treatments against N. ceranae.showing promising results; but further studies were needed to clarify the way oxalic acid as well as the compounds in ApiHerb worked against N. ceranae.
Never seen mention of chalk brood though
Maybe it's just a general thing (hope?) about organic acids having benefits when treating diseases with fungal origins. If it works for one, might it work for others. There was no source quoted where I came across this.
 
seems to packed full of secret snakeoil, hard to find a list of any contents apart from cinammon and garlic. I bet there's a dad of thymol in there - the only useful ingredient to treat nosema (whether apis or ceranae)
 
never heard that, or seen it discussed anywhere - sounds like a fairytale to me
@Wilco said something of the
Maybe it's just a general thing (hope?) about organic acids having benefits when treating diseases with fungal origins. If it works for one, might it work for others. There was no source quoted where I came across this.
@Wilco will did you post something to do with oa vs chalkbrood
Recently read something on here beekeyplayer
 
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Thanks. I shouldn't have to be told that. The trouble is that without a background in science, I quickly get lured off track...

I thought there were organic acids and synthetic chemicals - the two categories of chemical varroa treatments. Then, in the first article I read in this search, I discover that manufactured substances (like oxalic acid) are considered synthetic chemicals.

It's no big deal but it slows me down :unsure:
 
How does a fungal infection impact genetics?
It doesn't. Some bees seem more susceptible. I had a line of black bees that were very chalky. If you change the queen to an unrelated one it usually sorts the problem
 
We had two colonies that had really bad chalkbrood. Advice from the forum said to wait to see if it sorted itself out. One of the hives needed to be requeened, no problem after, the other improved with no action needed
 

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