Bee blower

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Sutty

From Glossop, North Derbyshire, UK
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Location
Glossop, North Derbyshire
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National
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4 to 12!
Extracting recently using clearer boards there were the usual few bees still in the supers.
I used the blower unit of a paint sprayer to blow the remaining bees out, it worked really well! The blower has a long hose about 3cm diameter, so easy to direct it between the combs.
This is the one I used but I'm sure others would work too.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/MYLEK-MYPS...=1661169273&sprefix=myelek+pai,aps,185&sr=8-3
 
I have a Stihl blower with the vacuum attachment doobrifart and used it once for blowing the bees out of a super, but felt it was a little harsh. Since then I take the supers to my garage, keep the light off and let the bees fly out of the window. Some I have to manually evict, which is time consuming and irritating, but it seems easier on the bees. I’m just an old softie I suppose.
 
Are you blowing an uncleared super?
I’d normally clear overnight and blow out stragglers but I’ve blown out occupied supers. It has a trigger/throttle so you can blow as much as you like.
 
I have a Stihl blower with the vacuum attachment doobrifart and used it once for blowing the bees out of a super, but felt it was a little harsh. Since then I take the supers to my garage, keep the light off and let the bees fly out of the window. Some I have to manually evict, which is time consuming and irritating, but it seems easier on the bees. I’m just an old softie I suppose.
I had quite a few stragglers after I cleared my supers on Saturday ... I waited until dusk and then cleared the frames one at a time putting the first lot into an empty super and gradually working my way through them. I was in the open working on a folding table just along from the apiary. I found the majority of stragglers happy to head off home given the brush off with a goose feather. Took a couple of hours but not unpleasant work on a warm evening.

I have an HVLP spraying set up and if I find supers have not cleared next year I might try with that as it's not a high velocity blow from it ... although, I also have a temperature adjustable hot air gun which can be set to no heat and has a low and high air setting as well and that may be an option.

Like you, I don't really like the idea of blasting them with a really strong blow of air.... big softie that I am !
 
I've always assumed it must be house bees that are left in the supers and wondered if they really stood much chance of finding their way home unless you're very close to the hives.

James
 
I use my blower to just get rid of the stragglers after I have used the clearer boards. I find it better to blow the bees out at the hive rather than take them to the honey room. I don't let any insects escape my honey room as I once wafted a load of bees out only to be inundated with bees within an hour or so once the evicted ones recruited their mates!
 
I use my blower to just get rid of the stragglers after I have used the clearer boards. I find it better to blow the bees out at the hive rather than take them to the honey room. I don't let any insects escape my honey room as I once wafted a load of bees out only to be inundated with bees within an hour or so once the evicted ones recruited their mates!
I've let them out and not had a problem, but they haven't been gorging on the honey!
 
I've always assumed it must be house bees that are left in the supers and wondered if they really stood much chance of finding their way home unless you're very close to the hives.

James
I think that’s right James, I have found the odd “lost” bee the following day, buzzing round the house, so perhaps a gale force wind blasting them near the hive is overall a better strategy. The ones I’ve manually evicted have been caught in a glass and taken back to the hives - which is why it is time consuming!
 
As previously said the leaf blowers have a throttle control you can give a gentle waft or full on blast depending what’s required. Plus there a handy bit of kit around the garden.
 
I've always assumed it must be house bees that are left in the supers and wondered if they really stood much chance of finding their way home
how do you think they manage when they go out for their daily dump?
 
how do you think they manage when they go out for their daily dump?

I had the impression that they don't go very far from the hive -- perhaps a few tens of metres at the most. So if I took them further than that I assumed they'd be unlikely to find their way home.

I used to know someone who just stacked the cleared supers uncovered in the back of their truck and drove home with any remaining bees flying out into the wind. I've no idea if any of them were ever likely to find their way home again.

James
 
I had the impression that they don't go very far from the hive -- perhaps a few tens of metres at the most. So if I took them further than that I assumed they'd be unlikely to find their way home.

I used to know someone who just stacked the cleared supers uncovered in the back of their truck and drove home with any remaining bees flying out into the wind. I've no idea if any of them were ever likely to find their way home again.

James
I thought we were talking blowing out supers, they don't get blown tens of yards away. I find the bees at home open their guts near the front of the house, so fifty yards or more from the apiary.
 
I thought we were talking blowing out supers, they don't get blown tens of yards away. I find the bees at home open their guts near the front of the house, so fifty yards or more from the apiary.

I have to carry some of my supers a few tens of yards before I can do anything with them. There's not even room to put a roof down on the ground near the hives. Fortunately the farmer who owns the land has said he'll have a good go at clearing it this winter so it should become easier next year.

If yours are going fifty yards then it's only the ones who are very reluctant to leave and make the trip home with me that might end up homeless.

Do you also use a leaf-blower to remove the stragglers, or some other method?

James
 
Do you also use a leaf-blower to remove the stragglers, or some other method?
nope - just clearer boards, I hardly end up with more than a dozen or two bees still in the supers when I unload them at home - they usually find their way to the home apiary just behind the main garden
 
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I've always assumed it must be house bees that are left in the supers and wondered if they really stood much chance of finding their way home unless you're very close to the hives.

James
I found this reply quite interesting. After further reading I found this-

Do nurse bees make orientation flights?


Not very scientific but still interesting.
 

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