Keeping bees in the garden

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BeeKeyPlayer

From Rainham, Medway (North Kent) UK
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Nov 9, 2018
Messages
825
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738
Location
Rainham, Medway (North Kent) UK
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
24 plus 12 owned by others
This came a couple of days ago! I guess most people first dream of beekeeping as a couple of hives (white WBCs) in the bottom of the garden. This is a book that was waiting to be written. As you would expect from Richard Rickitt (co-editor of BeeCraft) everything about this book is a delight. It begins (and I haven't gone much beyond that) with a wide perspective of why people might want to keep bees and how these aspirations fit into the place (and plight) of insects in the world today. A glance at the contents shows that this is a very complete book about beekeeping, whether or not the bees are in your garden. Perhaps the point is that the ability to continue to keep bees in your garden (and not irritate your neighbours) is very dependant on getting your beekeeping up to a standard that will ensure they quietly go about their business without upsetting anyone.

Also - and possibly this matters more to me than others - it is a well-designed book, as might be expected from Bloomsbury. I'm coming to think that books about bees published in the UK are a design-free area! Just because a book is self-published does not give an exemption on good design. I'm always amazed at how beautiful books are when I go to a bookshop. That's the world in which all books vie for attention.

R rickitt.jpg
 
Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens, I feel the premise of the book is irresponsible.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/beeke... looks at,parks, farmland and other locations.
Reading the publishers description doesn't inspire any more confidence. As soon as it resorts to the save the bees plea it looses credibility. I hope it reads better than it initially comes across
 
Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens, I feel the premise of the book is irresponsible.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/beekeeping-for-gardeners-9781399404853/#:~:text=Beekeeping for Gardeners looks at,parks, farmland and other locations.
Reading the publishers description doesn't inspire any more confidence. As soon as it resorts to the save the bees plea it looses credibility. I hope it reads better than it initially comes across
I haven't read the book ... the title is a worry. I keep my bees in my garden and they are no bother, I know what I'm doing and the space and location work for my bees - but ... like you ... I have seen new beekeepers who, encouraged by some to 'save the bees' have put a hive in a totally inappropriate space, in their garden, with little knowledge of the potential consequences and have come to the inevitable disaster.

I'm sure Richard Rickitt's motives are genuine but perhaps the title should come with the caveat 'at your peril' and 'with a back-up plan'.
 
Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens, I feel the premise of the book is irresponsible.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/beekeeping-for-gardeners-9781399404853/#:~:text=Beekeeping for Gardeners looks at,parks, farmland and other locations.
Reading the publishers description doesn't inspire any more confidence. As soon as it resorts to the save the bees plea it looses credibility. I hope it reads better than it initially comes across
They say don't judge a book by its cover, but what else can you go on before you buy it? I don't recognise what you say (save the bees plea) in the publisher's blurb. The book really does present a balanced and broad perspective. I would recommend it for the handout manual for beginners' courses. It is broader than a traditional how-to approach but in over 300 pages covers learning the craft very sensibly and thoroughly.

IMO. There's no reason to take my word, but we still hand out recommendations, and I never like to waste one myself.
 
Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens
I agree, that's a huge problem. I think the book offers something of a solution, rather than exacerbating matters. Anyone reading this before diving in to beekeeping will be far better equipped than they would be from self-guided online learning.
 
at twenty quid a pop for a paperback I can already guess the type of people that would snap it up.
But saying that, in the interest of science I've bought a copy for a laugh (we're all entitled to waste our money sometimes)
 
unfortunately
you come across as thinking beekeeper, whose not worries about asking questions. As it should be :cool:
I fear the majority will be in the gullible/money to burn camp. Me, I just pick up any book on bees - I even have Wedmore on ventilation on my bookshelf (it used to be on my bedside cabinet, but I no longer suffer from insomnia)
 
Also from the publisher's blurb: 'Importantly, and unlike any book before, this guide sets the delightful hobby of beekeeping within the context of the wider environment, asking how it can best serve the needs of all types of pollinator and the local ecology in general.'
 
Also from the publisher's blurb: 'Importantly, and unlike any book before, this guide sets the delightful hobby of beekeeping within the context of the wider environment, asking how it can best serve the needs of all types of pollinator and the local ecology in general.'
:unsure: :banghead:
 
Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens, I feel the premise of the book is irresponsible.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/beekeeping-for-gardeners-9781399404853/#:~:text=Beekeeping for Gardeners looks at,parks, farmland and other locations.
Reading the publishers description doesn't inspire any more confidence. As soon as it resorts to the save the bees plea it looses credibility. I hope it reads better than it initially comes across

Having had to deal with the issues of internet trained new beekeepers with hives in small back gardens, I feel the premise of the book is irresponsible.
https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/beekeeping-for-gardeners-9781399404853/#:~:text=Beekeeping for Gardeners looks at,parks, farmland and other locations.
Reading the publishers description doesn't inspire any more confidence. As soon as it resorts to the save the bees plea it looses credibility. I hope it reads better than it initially comes across
Hi, just wondered why the CV premise C is irresponsible? I am interested in the problems you have had to deal with due to garden bee keepers? thanks
 
Hi, just wondered why the CV premise C is irresponsible? I am interested in the problems you have had to deal with due to garden bee keepers? thanks
There are several issues:

1. Bees swarm - the swarm will find somewhere else to set up home - in the worst case scenario it will be your neighbours chimney or roof space.

2. Colonies of bees have varying temperament - if you end up with a hot colony your neighbour, people in the vicinity and even livestock, in the worst case scenario, could be stung - if the person stung is seriously allergic to bee stings - they could die.

3. if there is nothing to stop them, the bees will fly in a straight line out from the hive (ever heard the expression 'made a beeline for ...'.) If your neighbours patio, swimming pool, washing line etc, happens to be in their path - they could interfere with the neighbours enjoyment of their propert,y.

Obviously, with a bit of experience, all these things can be accommodated and overcome but, if we are looking at a new beekeeper, they may not be in the bit of the noddy guide to beekeeping they have read - indeed, in some beekeeping books the solutions may not even be in there !

So, sticking a hive of bees in the garden, whilst it may seem simple, that's just the point where it all begins and it is irresponsible to put bees in a back garden (particularly a small one that is in proximity to neighbours or the public) and let them get on with it ...
 
There are several issues:

1. Bees swarm - the swarm will find somewhere else to set up home - in the worst case scenario it will be your neighbours chimney or roof space.

2. Colonies of bees have varying temperament - if you end up with a hot colony your neighbour, people in the vicinity and even livestock, in the worst case scenario, could be stung - if the person stung is seriously allergic to bee stings - they could die.

3. if there is nothing to stop them, the bees will fly in a straight line out from the hive (ever heard the expression 'made a beeline for ...'.) If your neighbours patio, swimming pool, washing line etc, happens to be in their path - they could interfere with the neighbours enjoyment of their propert,y.

Obviously, with a bit of experience, all these things can be accommodated and overcome but, if we are looking at a new beekeeper, they may not be in the bit of the noddy guide to beekeeping they have read - indeed, in some beekeeping books the solutions may not even be in there !

So, sticking a hive of bees in the garden, whilst it may seem simple, that's just the point where it all begins and it is irresponsible to put bees in a back garden (particularly a small one that is in proximity to neighbours or the public) and let them get on with it ...
Thanks for taking the time to reply. I guess we have to rely on common sense etc. We have 2 hives in our garden but we are in a rural village, not a town or suburb. The hives are also next to a high hedge so the bees spiral up before heading off. For us it’s better to have them close so we can observe their behaviour when we go into the garden and learn to read them better. I think there are pros and cons for new bee keepers having the hives in the garden.
 
My hives are in my garden and always have been but I knew a bit about keeping bees before I actually got them ...it is nice to sit with a cuppa and watch them coming and going, if you forget a piece of kit or find you need something you don't have, you don't have to transport heavy supers across fields, you can look at the bees whenever it suits you and if they don't like it ... not a big deal to stop and call a halt.

But ...you still have to be a responsible beekeeper and what we all worry about on here is new beekeepers, with little real experience, who think it is fine to get bees, put them in a back garden and become a let alone beekeeper because they have been convinced they are 'helping the bees'.
 
unfortunately

I fear the majority will be in the gullible/money to burn camp. Me, I just pick up any book on bees - I even have Wedmore on ventilation on my bookshelf (it used to be on my bedside cabinet, but I no longer suffer from insomnia)
Do you use matchsticks as bookmarks?
 
unfortunately

I fear the majority will be in the gullible/money to burn camp. Me, I just pick up any book on bees - I even have Wedmore on ventilation on my bookshelf (it used to be on my bedside cabinet, but I no longer suffer from insomnia)
Screenshot_20240607_182137_Samsung Internet.jpg
Worth a few quid if hardback it seems.
 

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