I'm being forced to accept a new beekeeping agreement

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Jan 17, 2018
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
Location
LONDON
Hive Type
None
I'm being forced to accept a new beekeeping agreement from the allotment committee , changing it from a protocol to a licence to keep bees at the allotment .
can they do that if I'm not happy with the new terms ?
 
the allotment committee
What reason was given for the change in policy?

The back story would help to understand your situation better: council allotment or private? Complaints about bees? Committee prefer to keep you on a short lead in case of complaints? Committee personality differences, or change requested by another agency?
 
I'm being forced to accept a new beekeeping agreement from the allotment committee , changing it from a protocol to a licence to keep bees at the allotment .
can they do that if I'm not happy with the new terms ?
Not sure if you being happy has much to do with it if you are using others property?…..
 
I'm being forced to accept a new beekeeping agreement from the allotment committee , changing it from a protocol to a licence to keep bees at the allotment .
can they do that if I'm not happy with the new terms ?
It's entirely dependent upon the allotment control structure. Is the site owned by a local council, a formally constituted association, a charity or something else. 🤔
 
The allotment in 2019 set up a charity and has become self managed, and lease the land from local authority.
was previously managed by a external organisation , plot holders have become members constitution does even have the word plot holder
the main change in the new lease was the permitted use of the land so that any surplus produce can only be sold for the purpose of the charity
 
The allotment in 2019 set up a charity and has become self managed, and lease the land from local authority.
was previously managed by a external organisation , plot holders have become members constitution does even have the word plot holder
the main change in the new lease was the permitted use of the land so that any surplus produce can only be sold for the purpose of the charity
You maybe need to ask one of our law profession members but proper advice may attract fees.
 
I used to keep bees on an allotment site.
The allotment keepers were always grateful to me for caring for the bees there, and would show their gratitude in the form of fruit and vegetables at times.
They firmly believed that my bees increased their crops.
Maybe you should point out to the committee that you are performing a service on their behalf.

But if you are unhappy move your bees.
 
Offer the committee a number of jars of honey as a charitable contribution. You also have the possibility of giving 5% of your honey profits to the committee as payment for the use of your land.
 
The allotment in 2019 set up a charity and has become self managed, and lease the land from local authority.
was previously managed by a external organisation , plot holders have become members constitution does even have the word plot holder
the main change in the new lease was the permitted use of the land so that any surplus produce can only be sold for the purpose of the charity
So .. that's not going to affect you is it ? All they are doing is tightening things up so they don't get someone on there who uses it like a smallholding just so they can sell the stuff they grow. Honey is not produce .. unless they have specifically included hive products. What are you worried about ?
 
surplus produce can only be sold for the purpose of the charity
Do you mean that all profit from honey sales shall benefit the charity? That does seem peculiar.

permitted use of the land so that any surplus produce
It might be argued that honey is not produce of the allotment, in the way that it would be reasonable to attribute 100% of carrot production to the land. You might prepare for them an estimate to indicate that 99.989% of nectar comes from several surrounding miles.

Our allotment (council owned but run by local association) also prohibits sale of produce for profit, but they make no mention of the honey I produce there, except to ask the date of the next honey sale, when I give 15% off market prices.

Setting aside the wording, of more practical use is the means the Committee would use to assess your yield. Would you be obliged to declare a certified weight? Perhaps it's time for your bees to enter an unproductive zone, in which colony yield slumped. How would they know to know?
 
I would think it would not be difficult to prove that beekeeping is a non profit making business.

Just think of all those hours away from the allotment extracting and jarring honey!
 
I would think it would not be difficult to prove that beekeeping is a non profit making business.

Just think of all those hours away from the allotment extracting and jarring honey!
I disagree, beekeeping begins to be a profit-oriented activity at the same time that you are willing to "steal" your honey/labor.
And I specifically use this verb because you do not offer fair compensation to your hives beyond a few rations of oxalic (for their good) and leave at best a small fraction of your harvest for the winter.
 
I disagree, beekeeping begins to be a profit-oriented activity at the same time that you are willing to "steal" your honey/labor.
And I specifically use this verb because you do not offer fair compensation to your hives beyond a few rations of oxalic (for their good) and leave at best a small fraction of your harvest for the winter.
Utter rubbish. If I include my labour and all expenses in to my accounts I actually make a loss on my honey. It’s only the peripheral associated work that makes any money.
 
Utter rubbish. If I include my labour and all expenses in to my accounts I actually make a loss on my honey. It’s only the peripheral associated work that makes any money.
The thing is that the minimum is that you include your work and your expenses, since otherwise you are unconsciously undervaluing your work. And that is taking into account that the central force of the work belongs to the bees and not yours.
I think I'm missing the sarcastic point in my post.
 
5%?
The going rate is 1lb honey per hive per year to farmers for the use of their land.
I do not live in the United Kingdom and therefore I do not know that information, although when thinking about a fixed rate I did it in the amount of one pound for each kg of honey harvested. I also do not know the profit margin that the user wants to give to his beekeeping business.
 
Back
Top