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Elainemary, this frame? I asked another judge as I didn‘t agree with the braula diagnosis, and he agreed with me. I think it’s been frozen. View attachment 34844
There’s some funny sought of ridges on the wax but braula leave tunnels, I can’t see any! I think those 3 wet looking streaks could be a small crack/fracture that’s then caused them. That happens easily if frozen and banged.
 
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Thanks for the responses, keep them coming. Very interesting reading and lots to think about.
 
Elainemary, this frame? I asked another judge as I didn‘t agree with the braula diagnosis, and he agreed with me. I think it’s been frozen. View attachment 34844
Hi v difficult to say if it was this specific frame or not. The frames that were ‘placed’ by the judge were much better examples of perfect frames. I freeze my own cut comb and I’ve never seen markings like this afterwards,
 
One funny story...In 2013 I attended the National. I entered a cut comb...about a perfect specimen. Unfortunately my entry was disqualified as it was in the wrong style container. The rule was a standard comb honey container with a clear cover. I had that covered and the judge said I could use my "American" container. I asked the show organizers about it afterward. At my request they changed the rule to "A standard British comb honey" container. That was a good outcome as the rule was clarified.

The funny part...The head steward handed me a shopping bag...I should have known something was up by the grin on his face. Inside the bag? Half a dozen "British" comb honey containers with clear covers. I thoroughly enjoyed the joke.

On another note...I've been asked to attend the National this coming October for several presentations. Color me excited. If you do attend this year, I would enjoy meeting you.
 
They do seem to get everywhere. Except ears, oddly enough.

James
They were named earwigs because their wings (yes, they do have wings) resemble a human ear) the 'wig' component to the name was from the middle English name for beetle - wicga therefore ear beetle
 
One funny story...In 2013 I attended the National. I entered a cut comb...about a perfect specimen. Unfortunately my entry was disqualified as it was in the wrong style container. The rule was a standard comb honey container with a clear cover. I had that covered and the judge said I could use my "American" container. I asked the show organizers about it afterward. At my request they changed the rule to "A standard British comb honey" container. That was a good outcome as the rule was clarified.

The funny part...The head steward handed me a shopping bag...I should have known something was up by the grin on his face. Inside the bag? Half a dozen "British" comb honey containers with clear covers. I thoroughly enjoyed the joke.

On another note...I've been asked to attend the National this coming October for several presentations. Color me excited. If you do attend this year, I would enjoy meeting you.
That’s excellent news. I was planning to attend. I’ll be able to say hello too.
 
They were named earwigs because their wings (yes, they do have wings) resemble a human ear) the 'wig' component to the name was from the middle English name for beetle - wicga therefore ear beetle
They are also unusual in that the female will guard and tend a clutch of eggs and the young insects after hatching.
 

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