Co-evolution of mites and bees.

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user 20297

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Firstly, I will shoot off my own foot by saying that recent postings by @Beesnaturally have given me some directions for research and thought which I am finding very interesting. That's the sort of prompt that I want from a broad and enlightened forum membership. :)

It had already occurred to me that by focusing on so-called, "VSH", we were probably missing a whole load of less obvious behaviours and processes which some bees will naturally possess and which help them to cope with varroa. The co-evolution which Beesnaturally first alerted us to has been studied in a scientific way.

Apparently, "mites can change their reproduction when associated with surviving hosts and that the bee behaviors suppressing mite reproduction can vary over time."

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...12/2/120/pdf&usg=AOvVaw30nNQ4Y8dC4TNfR0WFMLG0
Obviously, I'm not advising anyone, new beekeepers in particular, not to treat their bees. But I do like the positivity and optimism that some of the research and the experiences of some beekeepers is giving me. :)
 
Obviously, I'm not advising anyone, new beekeepers in particular, not to treat their bees. But I do like the positivity and optimism that some of the research and the experiences of some beekeepers is giving me. :)

You just believe those "some beekeepers", and you do what they say". It will be good.
 
It has struck me before now that it may well be a very poor evolutionary avenue for varroa to follow if they consistently kill the host colony, as it's detrimental to their own survival. I wonder if we might eventually end up with a variety that is less harmful to bee colonies because it's own survival rate actually improves in the process.

James
 
It has struck me before now that it may well be a very poor evolutionary avenue for varroa to follow if they consistently kill the host colony, as it's detrimental to their own survival. I wonder if we might eventually end up with a variety that is less harmful to bee colonies because it's own survival rate actually improves in the process.

James
They probably spread to more colonies if they breed so successfully their host collapses scattering the survivors.
 

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