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Bcrazy 

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Came across this article;
Cause of Colony Collapse Disorder Identified?
How viruses and parasites interact to sap a colony of its ability to produce basic proteins needed for life.
August 25, 2009 at 9:46AM by Kim Flottum | 3 comments


“Lots of things start to make sense now, now that somebody has figured out at least some of the problem”.
That was the first thing that came to mind when I read the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences about viruses, proteins, malfunctioning ribosomes and Colony Collapse Disorder.
Scientists at the University of Illinois and the USDA, using information gleaned from the newly completed honey bee genome and a tool to arise from that information call a microarray (think of this as a massive screening of a tiny bit of honey bee tissue testing for hundreds, probably more, maladies, all at the same time from the same tissue sample), have found that honey bees from colonies suffering from symptoms of Colony Collapse Disorder have had the cellular structures in their bodies that manufacture the proteins necessary to combat stresses, pesticides, nutrition problems and more, compromised by viruses. These viruses, and there are many, one of which is the Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus looked at earlier, essentially capture the ribosome function of cells and hijack their capability to produce the components necessary to combat these problems, and force them to produce only more virus proteins.
Moreover, varroa mites are carriers of these kinds of viruses. Therefore, high varroa populations should enhance the probability that CCD symptoms will show up in a colony. And, mostly that''s true.
Do you see why it all makes sense now? Stressed colonies that have been overtaken by these viruses are not able to combat any of the legion of problems assailing a colony because the virus has a death grip on their protein-producing capability. Colonies collapsed because they couldn't fight the good fight and crashed. It's no wonder bees just don't seem to be the same any more. They aren't.
This discovery came from the University of Illinois, led by Reed Johnson, a Doctoral student there, working with May Berenbaum, entomology Professor and the Department Chair, and Gene Robinson, neuroscience professor at U of I and co-principal investigator. These were the folks who were in the thick of things investigating and finishing the honey bee genome study just recently completed. Reed received the prestigious Eastern Apicultural Society Student Award this summer at our meeting.
So now what? Now scientists can look at the molecular structure of a colony, perhaps a single bee, maybe even a queen or the drones she mates with, and tell you if they have, or their off spring will have this propensity to be susceptible to a picorna-like virus that causes this, or perhaps allows this to occur.
That information in itself is valuable. But still, how do you get a honey bee to eat when its ribosomes are compromised? Stay tuned for chapter two ....



Regards;


Also this


One salient fact has become very clear: Keep bees away from modern agriculture. There isn’t a crop out there that is safe for bees at any time of the year it seems. Corn and soybeans seem to be the most deadly ... and there is a lot of corn and soybeans out there.

Corn
Corn is deadly because most of it is seed-treated with systemic pesticides that move throughout the plant to protect it all season long ... and some winds up in bee-collected pollen that the bees take home to be stored and to kill yet unborn generations of baby bees. (This doesn’t include the possibility of harm to the environment and the people who live in corn areas due to atrazine pollution from corn crop management, but that doesn’t seem to be a bee problem at the moment. However, does your community test for this substance in your drinking water?). The label of the most-used corn chemical treatment even says that it is dangerous for honey bee brood, but that seems to not be an issue ... at least not for farmers, the EPA, or the state departments of agriculture responsible for enforcing label regulations....
 
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admin 

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Second part is very interesting for me,my bees are on Maize this week and I never thought about the possible effects of seed treatment,thanks Bcrazy..
 

steve1958 

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I think chemicals and pesticides are a major cause in the decline of Bee colonies.
Think about it. How do you kill an Ants nest?
You feed poison to a worker who then takes it back and feeds it to the Queen.
Our bees bring back poluted pollen and nectar, which gets stored, thus contaminating
other food reserves, and then the poor loves eat in.
 

admin 

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Problem is Steve each company say's its products are 100% safe,and they may well be alone.

But when they are added to the other dozen plus chemicals the bee's bring in you have a lethal mixture.
 

oliver90owner 

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possible effects of seed treatmentNot just maize.

OSR, sunflowers, sugarbeet. These and others have the seed treatment too.

'Sugarbeet?' you might say. Yes, but many feed sugar to their bees. Do we know if that sugar is completely free from pesticide? Well, it will be below the required maximum permitted level for human consumption .....Also, this family of 'ides' is persistent in the soil for some time. The sugarbeet tops and rape straw are often incorporated back into the soil and the next crop planted likely has more pesticide coated seeds to compound the possible problems for our bees.

So if the crop rotation happened to be OSR, maize, sugarbeet, (or some other combinations)the actual soil loading of these pesticides may never fall to near zero. That may well affect other members of the class Insecta, far more than our honeybees. Just a thought for readers to think about.

Regards, RAB
 

Bcrazy 

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Hi RAB,
Your last sentence where you say;
Just a thought for readers to think about.
that may bee OK for others but me, nar i cant fink I can only fort.

Regards;
 

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