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this is thought provoking, and very clever!!

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grizzly 

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I Like that.

My boss recently asked me why i leave on time and why i have a lunch hour, i put him straight very quickly that when my contractual time of finishing has been reached it is then my Daughters time, i do not expect to climb the career ladder or be rich, i will however be a GREAT dad.

And to hell with those who have made this society one where employers are allowed to behave in this manner and expect too much from the individual.
 

oliver90owner 

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Good on yer, Grizzly.

After all, those who climb higher have further to fall.....

I was nearly always lucky enough to have employers who appreciated when lunch break was interrupted or out-of-hours working was required. 'TOIL', it was called. Didn't pay the bills at Tesco's but was adequate compensation.

Regards, RAB
 

victor meldrew 

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Back when the average blue collar wage was £40, I was in charge of twenty odd women working on windows for the comet :driving:.
Equal pay was being mooted back then:nopity:.
These ladies were all for it . I posed a question " suppose you lived on a street were all the women on one side worked for £40 a week whilst on the other side the women stayed home looking after their children ,do you think the households with £80 per week would be better of by £40 per week ?"
"Of course they would you B****y fool." was the response.
I pointed out that I thought the £40 per week householders would be £40 worse off as prices would rise in line with the £80 per week household thus forcing the women from the £40 households to leave their children and become wage slaves just like their husbands , leaving the bosses rubbing their hands, knowing that it now needed two wage slaves to keep one door open . Neat eh! ?
At the time I didn't foresee the destruction of family life and gangs of disconnected kids roaming the streets creating mayhem :(.

John Wilkinson
 

Hombre 

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I Like that.

My boss recently asked me why i leave on time and why i have a lunch hour, i put him straight very quickly that when my contractual time of finishing has been reached it is then my Daughters time, i do not expect to climb the career ladder or be rich, i will however be a GREAT dad.

And to hell with those who have made this society one where employers are allowed to behave in this manner and expect too much from the individual.
I might have been tempted to make the observation that your salary hadn't had any significant increments added to it in your bank account recently either and conjecture that both your time keeping and salary were determined mutually in a contract that was probably cleared by at least one company director and the legal department. So how do your contract terms differ boss? By an significant increment that covers the - any extra hours that might be necessary clause I'll bet.

It's one of those, "Check the contract boss!" moments.

FWIW, I think you probably have it right and your boss needs to get a life or at least realise that you have one and all of it is not happening at work. :)
 
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Back when the average blue collar wage was £40, I was in charge of twenty odd women working on windows for the comet :driving:.
Equal pay was being mooted back then:nopity:.
These ladies were all for it . I posed a question " suppose you lived on a street were all the women on one side worked for £40 a week whilst on the other side the women stayed home looking after their children ,do you think the households with £80 per week would be better of by £40 per week ?"
"Of course they would you B****y fool." was the response.
I pointed out that I thought the £40 per week householders would be £40 worse off as prices would rise in line with the £80 per week household thus forcing the women from the £40 households to leave their children and become wage slaves just like their husbands , leaving the bosses rubbing their hands, knowing that it now needed two wage slaves to keep one door open . Neat eh! ?
At the time I didn't foresee the destruction of family life and gangs of disconnected kids roaming the streets creating mayhem :(.

John Wilkinson
Can't quite see what your point is here Victor, apart from offering an opinion on women which might have been better left unsaid.

I well remember in the 70's working as a cook at Loughborough General Hospital, my co-worker John worked with me in shifts covering breakfast, dinner (mid-day) and supper, the work was equal....in fact I did more than him as he regularly had a bad back and couldn't lift, but the pay wasn't equal.......I still can't see what was fair about that situation.

Most people in this country are capable of breeding, it doesn't mean they are equally cut out for the job or rearing the produced offspring. I stayed at home.......catering wages being what they were I would have paid what I earned in child-care. It doesn't alter the fact that child rearing can be mind numbingly tedious and boring. My mother-in-law often told the tale of having to scrub the cellar steps whilst in labour with second child. 2 days later she was back at work with the child outside in a pram......that would be 68 years ago.

Family life.......? family life is what family's make it, some succeed, some fail. Mothers working full time or not at all have very little to do with it.

You make no mention of men on poverty line wages and women having to work.........but as a blue collar worker you would be above that, did you close your eyes to the men on the shop floor and their appalling working conditions? Later I worked in the staff canteen at The Brush, so I saw the shop floor workers, blue collar, white collar, senior staff and managers on a day to day basis.......looking at them from behind the serving hatch....... You learn a lot behind there........behind a pub bar is also a good place, the customers generally talk as if you are not there......hmmm

Frisbee

PS. My dad worked on the shop floor, my mum worked full time....they were and still are savers....we had (God forbid) a car...we went on holiday, we had an automatic washing machine when they first came out...before non foaming detergents were available for them...they owned their own house...... Me! - Working class through and through, but now in the happy situation of being self employed, owning my house and being beholden to no-one :)
 
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victor meldrew 

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Hi Friz.
You and I are from different eras :). I was born pre war, Lancashire was mostly Coal and Cotton ! unless you were gifted (and lucky) you usually ended up in one of the two main industies. When I turned 15 years old I was told to report to Mossley common colliery on the next Monday morning (no choice there then (Mum was a widow and had been since I was 9 years old ). For my 16th birthday I was informed that I was now at an age when shift work applied !, the 2 till 10 shift was known as the old mans shift , very anti-social ( the other lads got the pick of the girls whilst you were down the pit:puke:.
Boys such as I were given very dangerous jobs on the haulage . Boys getting crushed between tubs ( usually caused by over zealous deputies signalling the engine driver to start the haulage because they deemed you were taking too long to re-rail a de-railed tub)were very common.
Yes I was raised during ww2 and the only men around were in exempt industries, women did work on munitions ,another filthy dangerous job plus the aircraft industry etc (the war effort and all that) but when I and my friends went home for what ever reason Mum was there ,the term latchkey kid hadn't been invented , the village policemen (not the plastic variety) lived and worked in the village so knew everything there was to know about it's saints and sinners .
Money was thin on the ground but family ties were much stronger than they appear today.
I escaped the coal mines when my youngest sister started work (in cotton as did my two elder sisters )by joining the Royal Air Force.
After demob I joined an Aircraft company and worked there for 42 years .
I think I am qualified to comment on working conditions from the very bottom up to Junior management ?.
As regards being in charge of ladies : this was during a period when my section was between contracts and I was asked to take over pro-tem .
This period certainly was a culture shock , until then (having been reared in and spoiled in ) an all female house hold I assumed all females to be maternal, nice, friendly creatures . Wow a quick learning curve was needed (very Quick ) I soon realised why their previous overseer jacked the job in pdq :svengo:.
Deceit and flattery,were the milder forms of manipulation they attempted :ack2:.

John Wilkinson
PS :rant:
 
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Hivemaker. 

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Brings back memories,thought it may appeal to our sense of humour John...lol:laughing-smiley-004
 

victor meldrew 

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They didn't get round to central heating Ours consisted of Mum sucking a strong peppermint and having us sit round her tongue .
:cheers2:

John Wilkinson
 

tonybloke 

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or tinsel on the tree at christmas, we had to wheel grandad round the tree and wait for him to sneeze.
 

TBRNoTB 

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Hi Friz.
You and I are from different eras :). I was born pre war, Lancashire was mostly Coal and Cotton ! unless you were gifted (and lucky) you usually ended up in one of the two main industies. When I turned 15 years old I was told to report to Mossley common colliery on the next Monday morning (no choice there then (Mum was a widow and had been since I was 9 years old ). For my 16th birthday I was informed that I was now at an age when shift work applied !, the 2 till 10 shift was known as the old mans shift , very anti-social ( the other lads got the pick of the girls whilst you were down the pit:puke:.
Boys such as I were given very dangerous jobs on the haulage . Boys getting crushed between tubs ( usually caused by over zealous deputies signalling the engine driver to start the haulage because they deemed you were taking too long to re-rail a de-railed tub)were very common.
Yes I was raised during ww2 and the only men around were in exempt industries, women did work on munitions ,another filthy dangerous job plus the aircraft industry etc (the war effort and all that) but when I and my friends went home for what ever reason Mum was there ,the term latchkey kid hadn't been invented , the village policemen (not the plastic variety) lived and worked in the village so knew everything there was to know about it's saints and sinners .
Money was thin on the ground but family ties were much stronger than they appear today.
I escaped the coal mines when my youngest sister started work (in cotton as did my two elder sisters )by joining the Royal Air Force.
After demob I joined an Aircraft company and worked there for 42 years .
I think I am qualified to comment on working conditions from the very bottom up to Junior management ?.
As regards being in charge of ladies : this was during a period when my section was between contracts and I was asked to take over pro-tem .
This period certainly was a culture shock , until then (having been reared in and spoiled in ) an all female house hold I assumed all females to be maternal, nice, friendly creatures . Wow a quick learning curve was needed (very Quick ) I soon realised why their previous overseer jacked the job in pdq :svengo:.
Deceit and flattery,were the milder forms of manipulation they attempted :ack2:.

John Wilkinson
PS :rant:
Victor
I can relate to everything you say, it was either pit, cotton or cable works in Leigh, born in '44 so a bit later than you. But were not pre-working age happy times! a thing lost to our children and grandchildren, the time spent out on expeditions with a 'trolly' on the ruckings! I'll be sobbing next......
:)
 
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