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Have they found the cause of ccd?

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Interesting, but it doesn't seem to explain the "why", in the sense of why it happened.
 

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There are many bee races in USA and they all have that "virus locus".
Why not in another countries.

They write that CCD is in Europe. Where here? Typical symptom that hive is empty of bees and brood have remained and handfull of nurser bees with queen.
 

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I think it is the other way around.
Poison causing parts of the DNA to shut down and stop protein synthesis.so allowing a virus to take hold.
 

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I think it is the other way around.
Poison causing parts of the DNA to shut down and stop protein synthesis.so allowing a virus to take hold.
I don't think so (though I've yet to read the original manuscript) ... the viruses they mention all replicate in a similar manner. They control (actually shut down) the host cell protein synthesis by cleaving part of the translation machinery of the cell that is unnecessary for translation of the virus proteins. In this way, more viruses are made in a cell that is essentially dying. Poliovirus is the prototype picornavirus (related to the two mentioned in the BBC article) and its replication is extremely well understood.

If a poison shuts down protein synthesis then, unless it's done in a very specific manner, the virus will not be able to replicate either. No virus has the apparatus for translating proteins ... they always 'steal' this ability from the host cell. In contrast, it's well established that many viruses 'tweak' the host cell protein synthesis machinery to suit their own replication at the expense of the host.

What the article doesn't address - as indicated above - is why things changed in 2006. Is this a new virus to bees? Is it a more pathogenic strain of a pre-existing virus? Have bees been made more susceptible to these viruses due to another infection - viral, bacterial or fungal?
 

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