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Would a queen continue to develop outside the cell

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robin 

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Hi

I a curious, if you remove a queen cell and open it up a few days earlier while the queen is in pupae, she is no longer eating? does being in a cell keep her moist?

Robin
 

robin 

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wassat no one has a view on this!

I removed a queen from her cell put her in a jam jar in the airing cupboard she died but did continue to develop, I don't know if she died due to lack of food, or cos she was not in the cell

any one got a good book to refer

I have read

a guide to bees and honey - Ted hooper

seasonal guide - ron brown (i think)

Colins bible of beekeeping

but as sooooo often pointed out - the bee's have not read the books
 

victor meldrew 

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I removed a queen from her cell put her in a jam jar in the airing cupboard she died but did continue to develop, I don't know if she died due to lack of food, or cos she was not in the cell

any one got a good book to refer

I have read

a guide to bees and honey - Ted hooper

seasonal guide - ron brown (i think)

Colins bible of beekeeping

but as sooooo often pointed out - the bee's have not read the books
Airing cupboard, jam jar , ? she was probably desiccated .

John Wilkinson
 

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I don't know if she died due to lack of food, or cos she was not in the cell
I keep QC's/ virgins in small jam jars in our home made honey warmer.
You need a bowl of water in the warmer to keep the humidity up.
In the jar:
put a small drop of your honey and 5-6 drops of water
I put a small piece of kitchen roll in the jar for the queen to hide or climb onto so she doesn't get water logged or sticky from the bottom of the jar.
Then put some mesh over the top of the jar & secure with elastic band.
Virgins can be kept for 2-3 days: wouldn't want to risk any longer & make sure you top up water and honey in jar each day.
Queen cells will only need topping up once the queen has emerged.
Your virgin would have survived if she had been fed and watered.
 

oliver90owner 

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Let's have a think here. Why DO bee larvae pupate in cells? They have been doing this for millions of years for no good reason? I think not.

RAB
 

robin 

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hmmm

OLIVER90OWNER

well that was a very usefull anwser, thank you for that amazing contribution to a curious mind

possibly - just possibly, they continue to develop in the cell due to being in a delicate condition and ( I don't know if you have noticed but bees climb all over each other) and they develop in the cell for protection

in my curiosity I am enquiring as to the science of the development, do they NEED to develop in the cell right up to the day they are strong enough to emerge or would they continue to develop outside the protection of the cell once past a certain point in development

again cheers for the useful input

I understand that I am a new beek but if you have nothing usefull to add then dont add it

but if you are like minded and curious feel free to respond
 
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There is no equivalent of the placenta in the pupa so after pupating in theory the immature bee could be removed but it would be very prone to infection and drying out I suspect. The pupa just adds protection and controls the environment.

There is a condition known as bald brood where the pupal cells are open at the end - I seem to recall the bees usually emerge normally but deformities are not uncommon.

Oh and Robin you're going to fit in well on this Forum!
 

robin 

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I have discovered there are lots of little sayings

rooftops - cheers for that

it is mainly curiosity, and if someone 'knows' the anwser then that is all I am asking for - hopefully in a nice and polite manner, I just don't apprieciate unhelpfull comments

yes nature is there for a reason, but it is usally good to understand what the reason is for, and if you are keen on somthing and want to help, more knowledge is better than less. (that is my opinon at least)

OLIVER90OWNER, do you leave your bees to do exactly as they please year in, year out? or do you try to understand their behaviour so you can pre-empt a swarm? and do somthing about it, because judging by your last statement 'bees know best' you leave em alone?

if everybody thought 'bees know best' we would all let them do exactly as they please, a bad tempered hive would stay a bad tempered hive, a hive that produces follower bees would be left alone, but instead WE try to breed out these things

another little saying
'bees don't read the theory'
I think we are lucky they don't cos they seem smart enough already

also I originally posted for helpfull advice I have recieved some and some others have not been quite so helpfull

but I won't let that bother me
 

oliver90owner 

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Robin,

You are just not really thinking are you?

Lets just think about 'swarming' for a moment.

Yes the bees do know best - they have insufficient space, are a mature colony and need to reproduce, etc.

Yes they know best. So I follow their needs - I ARTIFICIALLY SWARM THEM! What I do not do, like some on the forum, is try to continually thwart the bees' instincts.

I may well pre-empt the swarm by other techniques, but that may be too much over your head at your present level of knowledge. Your assessment of me seems to be so far off beam that I am wondering why I really bother to respond.

'she is no longer eating? does being in a cell keep her moist?' were the actual questions in your original post. The answer is yes on both counts. Think about it.
Metamorphosis can take months in some arthropods, so not eating, mouth parts are changing. Take her out and she will lose moisture. Simple, n'est pas? A few seconds thought and you should have arrived at those answers youself. Like I say, have a think before posting.
 

robin 

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ah ha

an almost helpful reply

If you read the initial question

WOULD A QUEEN CONTINUE TO DEVELOP OUTSIDE THE CELL

the other two are not really the questions, just asking if someone could validate the observation

I posted the question to see if some KIND HELPFULL EXPERIENCED beekeeper could awnser the question for me, maybe you are normally helpfull, kind and maybe you are experienced, I would not know and would not presume to judge but I asked an honest question to which your unhelpful reply was

" Let's have a think here. Why DO bee larvae pupate in cells? They have been doing this for millions of years for no good reason? I think not.

RAB "

where as the awnser is more like

"There is no equivalent of the placenta in the pupa so after pupating in theory the immature bee could be removed but it would be very prone to infection and drying out I suspect. The pupa just adds protection and controls the environment.

There is a condition known as bald brood where the pupal cells are open at the end - I seem to recall the bees usually emerge normally but deformities are not uncommon.

Rooftops"

now which one do you feel was most helpfull

not that I am not enjoying this little exchange, but rather than wasting your own time (not mine cos what else have i to do) maybe in future if you feel the need to reply - try to limit your replys to helpfull ones

rather than the ignorant reply you did post which successfully managed to hide any experience you may have in beekeeping

I don't claim to have any experience which is why I am asking questions, but no exeperience does not = stupid

thanks for all your input so far
 

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