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Equipment For Sale Uncapper for National frames

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Joined
Sep 13, 2011
Messages
804
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771
Location
Somerset
Hive Type
Other
Number of Hives
7
I am currently producing an economic uncapper which I have used personally. All food safe and easily used. Comes complete with the collecting drip and wax box and lid. See the photos below
 

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Seen similar in the USA and on YouTube. The ones I seen worked well enough and would be good to see a video of this design in action.
 
I thought things like this happened in China not Somerset
there's at least three similar versions of this uncapping system, all offered by different British sources - so I really do struggle to see what point you are trying to make.
 
there's at least three similar versions of this uncapping system, all offered by different British sources - so I really do struggle to see what point you are trying to make.
And a US version which AFAIK predates the UK ones.
 
I think the difference between this and Martin's will be cleaning. This version appears to have washers spaced by nuts so potential for debris to accumulate between them unless there's some form of coating. Martin's one is a single piece of metal which has been milled, hence easier to clean and much more expensive to produce. I'm not sure about other models.
 
Thanks for your comments. All parts are UK sourced and made and all food safe. Cleaning of the non-machined, all-stainless steel (no coating) rollers is initially by a cold water wash as is normal for many pieces of beekeeping harvesting equipment and this can be completed by an easy removal of the rollers complete with drive belt and washed at high temperature in a dish washer. Replacement is a simple reverse procedure. I hope this helps.

I do not have a video (next year honey crop allowing!) but the mechanism of use is similar to other models - push down and lift up. I aimed this at the hobby beekeeper.
 
I may be biased i i tested and then bought one of Martin's. My view is that it is great to see people producing units at differing qualities and price points. Just like with Bee Suits they range from ten to hundreds of pounds, variety is the spice of life. Well done for producing and look forward to see it in action. I used Martin's one on circa 300 frames this year, we estimate it leave 4- 6% more honey in the frame but saves 30 - 50% on time. Would be interesting to see similar tests with this one.
 
Thanks for your comments. All parts are UK sourced and made and all food safe. Cleaning of the non-machined, all-stainless steel (no coating) rollers is initially by a cold water wash as is normal for many pieces of beekeeping harvesting equipment and this can be completed by an easy removal of the rollers complete with drive belt and washed at high temperature in a dish washer. Replacement is a simple reverse procedure. I hope this helps.

I do not have a video (next year honey crop allowing!) but the mechanism of use is similar to other models - push down and lift up. I aimed this at the hobby beekeeper.
What is the price please ? Sorry if I missed it.
 
I am currently producing an economic uncapper which I have used personally. All food safe and easily used. Comes complete with the collecting drip and wax box and lid. See the photos below
How much without the box & lid? Ive got loads of these boxes kicking about so could use an existing one and it would be cheaper to post perhaps?
 
I see you are aiming at the hobby market. Any reasons you are you aiming at smaller commercial also ?
 
I am a hobby beekeeper with 7-8 colonies and have been for 45 years. In an average year from this number of colonies I would hope to have to extract approximately 200 frames and the uncapper helps with what I find the boring part of the year. I do wonder at what point one considers "hobby" moves to commercial beekeeping. I have no idea who on the forum is commercial and who is hobby. All I have done is offer a piece of equipment at a price which the home producer might consider. I hope this provides an answer for you,
 
Do these actually uncap frames or simply break the cappings that then make filtering from the extractor even more of a chore?
 
The uncapper bruises the cappings surface of the comb cutting in straight vertical lines as you suggest, not digging deep into the comb - it is not a slicing action . Even slicing the cappings with a manual or electric knife leaves plenty of small bits of wax - been there and done it. I have used an uncapping fork in the past but the cappings however produced were always filtered through a coarse stainless filter separately and for the honey, post extraction then a fine nylon filter on the way before settling tank and jarring. Can't say that the uncapper makes a difference in that regard. It is faster and less sticky. I do have a Thomas extractor which has a large integrated filter between the extractor cage and tank underneath but it does not catch the smallest stuff. The cappings and honey all has to be filtered at some point and there is really no way round that. At least you don't have to be there for that process except to check for overflowing buckets!! Hope this helps.
 

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