Ross Rounds?

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
231
Reaction score
167
Location
South Oxfordshire
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
8
I fancy having a go at Ross Rounds next season. Can anyone recommend a UK supplier? There don't seem to be many that I can find and Thornes are out of stock
 
Have Mann Lake disappeared - I can't seem to find a UK website for them. Previous links just show a page not found. I know the UK end had some problems, but thought someone else had taken over supplying their kit
 
I get most of our supplies for them from maisi. We produce around 850/1000 @ year, Borage/wildflower and Heather. Seems not the demand their used too be as so many have jumped on the bandwagon, there is still nearly 700 in our freezers.
We used to get a good premium, but now on a par with cut comb.
Currently working with a packaging company to produce a food safe cardboard ring to replace the plastic.
 
One concern I have heard is that people don't like the amount of single use plastic involved. I guess the market is too small for makers of recycled or plastic alternatives to get involved
 
Are Ross Rounds any good?
Best results are from strong colonies, or a big swarm (or several chucked together) on a strong flow. With the former, as bees are best condensed to work rounds, swarming is a risk.

Swarms work well if hived on BB and RR box from the start, as bees assess the perimeter of a new nest and work it all.

Good sources of info:
https://rossrounds.com/producing-comb-honeyhttps://www.northernbeebooks.co.uk/products/taylor-the-comb-honey-book/
Richard Taylor was an American Professor of Philosophy and ran 300 colonies, mostly for comb honey. He strikes me as a most charismatic individual (see pdf below). The book is essential reading as it is practical and written beautifully.

RR set-up is not cheap (keep an eye on eBay) but the boxes are not complex to make (check link info above).

Unfinished combs can be stored until the following season if protected from fermentation, vermin & wax moth.

Finished combs can be frozen before use, but handle carefully as broken cappings bleed when unfrozen. I sell a comb (they're 227g) for £12 in London.
 

Attachments

  • 2019-11-miksha-abj-richard-tayor.pdf
    1.5 MB · Views: 2
I agree. Have contemplated offering a small sum to customers to return the inner rings (to which the combs are fixed) for cleaning and re-use. Don't boil them, though!
Thank you - all very useful information. I have ordered the Taylor book. I'm wondering about using food grade cardboard to make the rings. I wonder if whether they were dipped in wax they would survive the humidity, or whether the bees would just pull them to bits
 
I get most of our supplies for them from maisi. We produce around 850/1000 @ year, Borage/wildflower and Heather. Seems not the demand their used too be as so many have jumped on the bandwagon, there is still nearly 700 in our freezers.
We used to get a good premium, but now on a par with cut comb.
Currently working with a packaging company to produce a food safe cardboard ring to replace the plastic.
Sounds interesting........let us know how you get on as the plastic element has always been the reason I've been wary of them.
 
Best results are from strong colonies, or a big swarm (or several chucked together) on a strong flow. With the former, as bees are best condensed to work rounds, swarming is a risk.

Swarms work well if hived on BB and RR box from the start, as bees assess the perimeter of a new nest and work it all.

Good sources of info:
https://rossrounds.com/producing-comb-honeyhttps://www.northernbeebooks.co.uk/products/taylor-the-comb-honey-book/
Richard Taylor was an American Professor of Philosophy and ran 300 colonies, mostly for comb honey. He strikes me as a most charismatic individual (see pdf below). The book is essential reading as it is practical and written beautifully.

RR set-up is not cheap (keep an eye on eBay) but the boxes are not complex to make (check link info above).

Unfinished combs can be stored until the following season if protected from fermentation, vermin & wax moth.

Finished combs can be frozen before use, but handle carefully as broken cappings bleed when unfrozen. I sell a comb (they're 227g) for £12 in London.


That writing about Richard Taylor is fabulous.
 
I have a box I forgot to use this year, also planning to try it out this year. I wonder if some thin balsa wood would work in the sections instead of the plastic. If it was soaked then put in the rings?
 
I have a box I forgot to use this year, also planning to try it out this year. I wonder if some thin balsa wood would work in the sections instead of the plastic. If it was soaked then put in the rings
Yes, I’m trying to think of something food safe yet bee ‘acceptable’
 
Yes, I’m trying to think of something food safe yet bee ‘acceptable’
The wood sections are just wood, not particularly described as food safe, similarly the super frames, I think something like balsa would be ideal, easy (ish) to bend and just as suitable as any other equipment used in the hive.
 
Back
Top