Installing a feeder on a crown board

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Dear All,

A couple of questions please - I have a WBC hive and the Crown board has two oblong holes with 2 Porter escapes. I'm due to collect my first nuc tomorrow, and will need to feed them once they are ensconced. I have a round rapid feeder. I'm assuming that I place the hole of the feeder directly over one of the holes? If I do that, it seems that it may occlude the other and that makes ventilation an issue - or not? Also do I need to put the queen excluder on before the crown board? that practice seems to vary (obviously no super yet).

Thank you - in addition (sorry) the weather here in the South West looks a bit iffy - if it's ambient 8-9 deg 🥶will it be OK to transfer the frames from the nuc or should I leave the nuc alone for a while and wait for a better day ? (planning to give it at least 24 hours anyway so the ladies know where they are).

Sorry for the multiple queries. I appreciate your time in answering.

Jon
 
need to feed them
Not necessarily, unless the nuc is light.
See the other thread, which asked similar questions.

place the hole of the feeder directly over one of the holes
Yes.

may occlude the other and that makes ventilation an issue - or not?
Top ventilation will hold back colony development. Seal the CB with a board of 50mm PIR, until you need to feed.

leave the nuc alone for a while and wait for a better day
No harm in that, provided they're not so full that the Q has nowhere to lay. If that is so, swarming will follow directly.

A better beekeeping day does not always arrive, and the job must be done. Balance the two demands.
 
1) Throw away the porter escapes, they are a useless anachronism clung onto by the occasional dinosaur.
2) The two holes are another anachronism, a hangover from wartime 'economy' measures when the crownboard was a multi purpose tool, when not in use (for feeding) they should be covered over with a piece of thin ply, a piece of slate or something of that sort. research other methods of clearing bees down such as the rhombus escape.
3) hives don't need any ventilation other than what the bees arrange themselves, so as 2) cover up the holes when not feeding.
4) no, you don't need to put a queen excluder on until you have honey supers on
 
Thank you - in addition (sorry) the weather here in the South West looks a bit iffy - if it's ambient 8-9 deg 🥶will it be OK to transfer the frames from the nuc or should I leave the nuc alone for a while and wait for a better day ? (planning to give it at least 24 hours anyway so the ladies know where they are).
5)no need to give the bees 24 hours, you can transfer them to a hive straight away if you feel the need. 8-9 degrees is fine if you are just moving them over, rather than a full blown inspection.
Unless the nuc is jam packed with bees and brood, it is safe to leave them in there for a while.
 
Not necessarily, unless the nuc is light.
See the other thread, which asked similar questions.


Yes.


Top ventilation will hold back colony development. Seal the CB with a board of 50mm PIR, until you need to feed.


No harm in that, provided they're not so full that the Q has nowhere to lay. If that is so, swarming will follow directly.

A better beekeeping day does not always arrive, and the job must be done. Balance the two demands.
Thanks - that's very helpful.
 
1) Throw away the porter escapes, they are a useless anachronism clung onto by the occasional dinosaur.
2) The two holes are another anachronism, a hangover from wartime 'economy' measures when the crownboard was a multi purpose tool, when not in use (for feeding) they should be covered over with a piece of thin ply, a piece of slate or something of that sort. research other methods of clearing bees down such as the rhombus escape.
3) hives don't need any ventilation other than what the bees arrange themselves, so as 2) cover up the holes when not feeding.
4) no, you don't need to put a queen excluder on until you have honey supers on
Thank you!
 
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