Extractor part names

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Kaz

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Hi, I have a manual 12 frame radial extractor and a (cheap) electric 4 frame tangential extractor and I've just had the brilliant idea of swapping the baskets so I have an electric 12 frame. It works - almost! Turns out the spindle is about 1cm too short. I want to see if I can source a longer " collar" thingy but don't know what it's called to search... can anyone help please and tell me what this bit is called? Thanks 😊
 

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Hi, I have a manual 12 frame radial extractor and a (cheap) electric 4 frame tangential extractor and I've just had the brilliant idea of swapping the baskets so I have an electric 12 frame. It works - almost! Turns out the spindle is about 1cm too short. I want to see if I can source a longer " collar" thingy but don't know what it's called to search... can anyone help please and tell me what this bit is called? Thanks 😊
... or any ideas on how to extend the length of the spindle by 1cm - I've tried googling "spindle extender" but no useful results 😕
 
Got any pictures with a bit more of the extractor for context? Can you put some sort of bracket at the base to raise it up?

If need be, what about a bolt (cut the head off) of the correct diameter and length with a cuff of metal tube to put it in thjw right place. Either get it welded on or drill through and use split pins or small bolts through it if you want to be able to reverse it later on. This would be weaker and may need multiple bolts/pins.

See shocking diagram below

image_2022-05-05_16-27.jpg
 
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Use a nut put partly on to the shaft with your bolt extension also partly on the other side of the nut and tighten up. A more cylindrical type nut might be available to make it easier.
 
Hi, I have a manual 12 frame radial extractor and a (cheap) electric 4 frame tangential extractor and I've just had the brilliant idea of swapping the baskets so I have an electric 12 frame. It works - almost! Turns out the spindle is about 1cm too short. I want to see if I can source a longer " collar" thingy but don't know what it's called to search... can anyone help please and tell me what this bit is called? Thanks 😊
Find a friend with a lathe or one who works in an engineering shop. Get him/her to make you a cylindrical sleeve with hole through the middle to accept the two rods either end. (If the rods are different diameter the hole can be different either end). When assembled drill a hole through sleeve and rod at either end and use a split pin through to secure the rods into the sleeve. Simples!
If you can't find a suitable friend you could diy with a bit of stainless steel rod from eBay and use a drill by hand. Need to use decent, sharp twist drills
 
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It's a fairly simple job for anyone with a metal turning lathe ... take your extractor to any small engineering workshop with the spare basket and ask them to make you a conversion piece in stainless steel. one end will need to fit over the motor spindle and the other will need to allow the joiner piece to go on the other end. If you want it a permanent arrangement they could do an intererence fit - if you want to change things back you will need a grub screw to hold the sleeve on the motor spindle.

Most engneers are used to people who don't speak engineeringese - you just need to tell them in laymans terms what you want to do with it and their creative juices kick in.

If you were a bit nearer I could knock one up in about half an hour ... but, you need the kit to take some accurate measurements and fit the modified bits.
 
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It's a fairly simple job for anyone with a metal turning lathe ... take your extractor to any small engineering workshop with the spare basket and ask them to make you a conversion piece in stainless steel. one end will need to fit over the motor spindle and the other will need to allow the joiner piece to go on the other end. If you want it a permanent arrangement they could do an intererence fit - if you want to change things back you will need a grub screw to hold the sleeve on the motor spindle.

Most engneers are used to people who don't speak engineeringese - you just need to tell them in laymans terms what you want to do with it and their creative juices kick in.

If you were a bit nearer I could knock one up in about half an hour ... but, you need the kit to take some accurate measurements and fit the modify bits.
LIDL were selling digital verniers for not much money a few weeks ago.
 
LIDL were selling digital verniers for not much money a few weeks ago.
Yes ... I have one of theirs from a few years ago ... they are pretty good for what they cost - perfectly adequate for most fine measuring jobs but you can't beat an old fashioned micrometer for absolute accuracy for engineering purposes.
 
Yes ... I have one of theirs from a few years ago ... they are pretty good for what they cost - perfectly adequate for most fine measuring jobs but you can't beat an old fashioned micrometer for absolute accuracy for engineering purposes.
You need to teach the user the art of how to manipulate a micrometer 😎
 
Yes ... a bit like the art of using a slide rule ... now something largely consigned to history ... I still have mine from my college days - museum piece now !
Ditto... I tried to show my 12yo granddaughter how to use it recently.... I was met with blank stares!
 
I was far to lazy at collage and bought myself a set of digital micrometers, internal & external, they
now reside in bottom drawer of toolbox and unused for far too many years.
 
Ditto... I tried to show my 12yo granddaughter how to use it recently.... I was met with blank stares!
I tried to explain logarithm tables to my, now, 43 year old son (who took double maths and physics at A level and has an MPhil in Control Sytems Engineering) and his comment ... Didn't they let you use a calculator then ?.... We then had the conversation that my first Litten Hand Held batter calculator only came on to the market in 1973 !

I sometimes feel that my family think I'm a time traveller who got lost somewhere on his travels !
 
I tried to explain logarithm tables to my, now, 43 year old son (who took double maths and physics at A level and has an MPhil in Control Sytems Engineering) and his comment ... Didn't they let you use a calculator then ?.... We then had the conversation that my first Litten Hand Held batter calculator only came on to the market in 1973 !

I did double maths, physics and art for A Level, but based on your son's age it would have been twelve years earlier. We covered log tables. Even had books of them. And trig tables too. Calculators were acceptable for the maths exams at least and in fact I still have the calculator I used then, but at least at one point we were expected to be able to use books of tables. Could be that we had to use tables for straight maths and were allowed calculators for further maths. I really can't recall.

On the other side of the coin my son did double maths, physics and chemistry for A Level, finishing school last year, and his courses covered all sorts of stuff we never even discussed the existence of. Stuff like quantum physics, field theory or anything to do with cosmology wasn't even talked about back then. If someone had mentioned something like the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram or Fermions and Bosons in our day the teachers would probably have gone into meltdown.

James
 

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