Which apiary location?

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Newbeeneil

Queen Bee
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Location
Fernhurst Sussex
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
40 plus 23 that I maintain for clients.
I have been offered several locations within 35 acres of woodland and meadow and would be grateful of any advice.
The 3 locations I have identified are all different with different possitives and negatives.

Site 1
This is close to an A road but the exact location would not be visible. I would have to strim an area in a massive bramble patch (100x20m) so no one could approach the hives except via the path I cut through and I could erect fencing and a gate across this. There is no parking for a vehicle of any size at the end of this path and the end is overlooked by houses.
The area is directly under power lines.

1691525881713.jpeg

Site 2
This is about 200yrds from the A road across a meadow which may get a bit wet during the winter. The area is in a wood with no public access but a few local kids seem to roam in the woods and have nicked items out of the owners shed on site.

1691526860831.jpeg

Site 3
This is further into the woods but more open and less likely for anyone to stumble apon the area. Both sites 2&3 are acessed via a track through the woods as the owner has an area where his family camp and play further up the track.

1691527229831.jpeg
 
Site #1 to easy for theft if near to A road, locals will soon know of it as over looked so word will get out. 11kv lines low overhead no thanks.
Site #2 too shaded and liable to vandalism, too much debris to fall.
Site #3 bright open spot depends on ease to get in and out.
 
3 without hesitation. Maybe I would leave them in the semi-shade area with the entrances facing W-S
1 is too accessible and can pose risks with slightly unruly bees. Power lines are not good companions.
2 is not as accessible but there is also a risk, the vegetation cover is large and the risk of high humidity in winter can play tricks.
 
What's the spiky vegetation in the foreground of photo 3? I can't tell, but it might be indicative of the ground being more soggy than desirable.

James
 
What's the spiky vegetation in the foreground of photo 3? I can't tell, but it might be indicative of the ground being more soggy than desirable.

James
They look like reeds, although they mostly inhabit wet and swampy terrain, there are exceptions.
 
I think the spikey stuff is nobby club rush so there may be a few damp areas. TBH 3 looks best but it is about 1/2 mile up a track that is likely to be muddy for 6 months of the year so early and late work may be a pain.
Site 2 is much more accessible and slightly closer to some houses at the edge of the wood. So they would notice vehicles coming or going.
I could drive right to the hives but as can be seen it’s a bit shaded.
 
muddy for 6 months of the year
Do you have a 4x4? 3 looks good but damp. Whether it's knobby club rush (had to look that up) or not, it's a sedge type of plant that loves wet ground. There'll be a higher patch in there somewhere, and a plastic pallet will help.
 

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