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Ely

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 13, 2009
Messages
2,684
Reaction score
258
Location
Norfolk
Hive Type
Langstroth
Number of Hives
4
Hi. With polyhives being significantly more expensive than wooden seconds at the moment, I am wondering if the polyhives would make up that cost difference in producing more honey. I have read that they can produce up to 15% more honey compared to a colony in wood that has similar variables other than what hive it is in. I guess what I am asking is, what are your experiences? Do the costs balance out?

At the moment I can get a Langstroth complete hive with frames and foundation, 2 supers for £148. A similar set up for Abelo/Lyson would be roughly £254

Cheers
 
All hives are a long term investment really. Any box that helps them maintain a stable environment more easily is right for me. Have you looked at other manufacturers like honeypaw?
 
Abelo ready painted. If bare the others need to be painted to protect from UV (I use dark brown masonry paint). I buy the brood boxes and the supers. To cut costs I make floors and roofs. Poly does last well if you take care of them - my oldest are 47 years old now! A quick paint every other year. Honeypaw - one brood and 2 supers well less than £100 if you do the roofs and floors yourself. That's a good price you have for your Langstroth with the frames and foundation at £148
 
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Do the costs balance out?
Balance initial cost against future long-term practical value, and factor in fiddly labour to assemble wood seconds.

Abelo are best value National poly, not necessarily on price but on efficiency of use; if I had Lang, I'd choose Honey Paw: well-designed and good value.

Never under-estimate the value of thermal efficiency: it will benefit bees most, but also improve your yield.
 
I like my Poly hives - at the time I bought most of my kit they were good value compared to wood and with the added benefits of insulation. Sadly, they are now becoming quite expensive - my hives are Paynes 14 x 12 and currently a set up at full price including two supers and a good quality hive strap £210 .. without the frames ... it's a lot of money. I keep my eye open for used ones these days ...they do come up fairly regularly as they are very much a 'one man's feast, another man's poison' format - I like them for a lot of reasons but they have their drawbacks but some people seem unable to get along with them and sell them on (fortunately for me !).

This one is a bit too far away to collect ...

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/23552968...Hy2TNDg4+YYqCQb/4GpsuwWEWF|tkp:Bk9SR5CO9KLjYw
 
Balance initial cost against future long-term practical value, and factor in fiddly labour to assemble wood seconds.

Abelo are best value National poly, not necessarily on price but on efficiency of use; if I had Lang, I'd choose Honey Paw: well-designed and good value.

Never under-estimate the value of thermal efficiency: it will benefit bees most, but also improve your yield.
I like the fact that Honeypaw hivescome in the flat which allows you to assemble them without glue due to the dovetail joints. In years to come you can take them apart, run them through a bandsaw to take a slice of the bottom/top and glue a thin piece of wood as protection against hive tool usage. Just a thought.
 
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