How to stop the spread?

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Antipodes

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Wilco

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It seems impossible to eradicate something as large as feral dogs or rabbits. So something as small as a varroa mite or a coronavirus. . . .. ?
You're doomed.

But short term. . . . FIND THE [email protected] WHO INTRODUCED THEM! :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:

. . .. Ben
I was thinking that although it may be that it was picked up during inspections on a legally imported package if it's near a port so it might not be a scoundrel at fault. (I don't know Aus rules on importing bees though).
 
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I was thinking that although it may be that it was picked up during inspections on a legally imported package if it's near a port so it might not be a scoundrel at fault. (I don't know Aus rules on importing bees though).
It surprises me that NZ managed to import varroa given the bio-hazard measures I saw as a tourist 10? 15? years ago.
 

Ian123

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Aussie security is tight it’s winter there atm so maybe little swarming as well. If they can get an idea on how far it’s spread already I bet they start with destruction. Container ships regularly carry swarms and AHB.
 
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I was thinking that although it may be that it was picked up during inspections on a legally imported package if it's near a port so it might not be a scoundrel at fault. (I don't know Aus rules on importing bees though).
I'd lean towards finding the culprit or the lax policy rather than finding the excuse. Next it will be Small Hive Beetle imported into the UK. Are you going to going to shrug your shoulders and say "Ah but it was in a legally imported package".
. . . . Ben
 
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Aussie security is tight it’s winter there atm so maybe little swarming as well. If they can get an idea on how far it’s spread already I bet they start with destruction. Container ships regularly carry swarms and AHB.
One load of pots from China carried Asian Hornet to Europe. Isn't that the story. And they are a disaster for ALL insects in the area.
My natural pessimism can develop into complacency. Depressing.
 

Wilco

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I'd lean towards finding the culprit or the lax policy rather than finding the excuse. Next it will be Small Hive Beetle imported into the UK. Are you going to going to shrug your shoulders and say "Ah but it was in a legally imported package".
. . . . Ben
My point was more that this could be that it's bees which were legally imported, inspected and it was found thus can be stopped. Hence making sense of the line in the article that all affected hives have been isolated. This is different to someone not following the rules or failure to detect it leading to an outbreak. In fact, it would suggest that the inspection system used is working.

If SHB or any other exotic disease makes it to the UK, and gets past inspection to be able to spread, I agree with finding those at fault but in this instance, I'm not sure that's an accurate comparison.
 

Wilco

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Aussie security is tight it’s winter there atm so maybe little swarming as well. If they can get an idea on how far it’s spread already I bet they start with destruction. Container ships regularly carry swarms and AHB.

How do the bees survive being offshore with no forage and a home that's moved by the time they get back on the occasions they are close enough to shore to be able to forage?
 

jenkinsbrynmair

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How do the bees survive being offshore with no forage and a home that's moved by the time they get back on the occasions they are close enough to shore to be able to forage?
How did the bees manage when they first were brought down there on sailing ships?
the only time these blue water ships get near the shore now is when they leave port and when they arrive at the other end of the journey
 
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My point was more that this could be that it's bees which were legally imported, inspected and it was found thus can be stopped. Hence making sense of the line in the article that all affected hives have been isolated. This is different to someone not following the rules or failure to detect it leading to an outbreak. In fact, it would suggest that the inspection system used is working.

If SHB or any other exotic disease makes it to the UK, and gets past inspection to be able to spread, I agree with finding those at fault but in this instance, I'm not sure that's an accurate comparison.
Haven't read the article. The problems with invasive species just make me depressed.
 

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My understanding is there are no general bee imports to Australia for use outside of strict quarantine. The article I saw had them in a large cage for drone sperm harvesting and grafting.
As to swarms surviving they do!!swarms on container ships are not uncommon. Bees can also find homes in containers and products being shipped. Meaning they may also have access to a certain amount of stores. The east coast and Adelaide in the south are on alert for AHB on board ships from Africa.The Caribbean islands are prime examples of ships importing both Varroa and AHB on many occasions.
 

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My point was more that this could be that it's bees which were legally imported, inspected and it was found thus can be stopped. Hence making sense of the line in the article that all affected hives have been isolated. This is different to someone not following the rules or failure to detect it leading to an outbreak. In fact, it would suggest that the inspection system used is working.

If SHB or any other exotic disease makes it to the UK, and gets past inspection to be able to spread, I agree with finding those at fault but in this instance, I'm not sure that's an accurate comparison.
Varroa was found in sentinel hives.
 

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i think australia is fortified

and them defence (the purple hive project) is really wow

well, will feel really sorry for them if spread around dont wish for but ll feel also ''happy'' for us(dont get me wrong pls) cause you know the more peepl more universities/studies/resources, new ideas/methods....... against it may will come up
 

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