Hive insulation

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

Beekeeperjim 

New Bee
Joined
Apr 29, 2021
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Number of Hives
1
Hi everyone, going into my 1st winter i would apperciate some advice on keeping my bees warm through the winter. My current set up is 2 National hives with Roof, Crown board, Brood box, under super and OMF. i am thinking about installing a layer of Kingspan insualtion directlly above the crown board (25/50mm), Should i cut slots to allow the hive to breath with rising moisture through the vents ?. Also should i fit the correx floor to prevent draughts coming up through the OMF? i am also considering a cozy hive wrap, is this too much ? for context, i am based in the South, Hampshire / Surrey border and the hives are in a a reasonbaly shelterd position.

Any advise appreciated to help my girls survive thier 1st winter with me
 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
24,709
Reaction score
6,142
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
13
Should i cut slots to allow the hive to breath with rising moisture through the vents ?. Also shoudl i fit the correx floor to prevent draughts coming up through the OMF? i am also considering a cozy hive wrap, is this too much ?
No
No unless there is a decent gap at the back and you are prepared to clean it every couple of days
No. I use them but I am in wales
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

International Beekeeper of Mystery
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Messages
28,554
Reaction score
6,384
Location
Glanaman,Carmarthenshire,Wales
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Too many - but not nearly enough
cut a piece of kingspan which fills the whole of the roof space, glue it in and keep it there throughout the year, no vents needed so these should be blocked off, probably by the Kingspan. Also make sure your feeder holes are covered over (unless feeding)
No wrapping required
 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
24,709
Reaction score
6,142
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
13
Rising moisture takes heat with it. Allowing it to escape makes no sense. If the top is warmer than the sides ( insulation) you won’t get any condensation onto the bees.
If you are going to use a cosy…..But I wouldn’t bother where you are…. Make sure there is more insulation on the top than the sides.
 

Hebeegeebee 

Queen Bee
***
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
2,132
Reaction score
137
Location
S.E. Norfolk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
12 on a good day, often more..
Bees will almost certainly block up any vent-holes above them if they can. That tells you all you need to know; A vent in the roof will mean that an insulation there is largely useless.
I see cozies advertised, but they will be almost useless unless the roof is well insulated too.

Correx boards will probably get blown away unless you fix them in position somehow.
 

DonkeyDonz 

New Bee
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
27
Reaction score
2
Location
East Sussex
Hive Type
none
cut a piece of kingspan which fills the whole of the roof space, glue it in and keep it there throughout the year, no vents needed so these should be blocked off, probably by the Kingspan. Also make sure your feeder holes are covered over (unless feeding)
No wrapping required
Can I use the Porter bee escapes to block the feeder holes? TIA
 

Patrick1 

Field Bee
***
Beekeeping Sponsor
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
544
Reaction score
412
Location
Canterbury CT4 5HW
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
300
If you look at your house you will notice that no areas are completely sealed, Kingspan for instants is left loose to allow for essential air flow. The insulation will still do its job if you leave a small gap to allow air movement.

If you are worried about moisture then use a carpet tile above a crown board, it works for me.
 

Hiveanidea 

New Bee
Joined
Jul 8, 2019
Messages
59
Reaction score
21
Location
East Devon
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
7incl.14x12
Can I use the Porter bee escapes to block the feeder holes? TIA
Porter bee escapes, if you use them indeed, will get completely gummed up with propolis and a pain to clean! In any case, they have a bee (air) way through them. Unfix them and cover the holes in the crown board with plywood squares, as has been said, your bees will ‘glue’ them in place and you can easily crack them off when necessary. For insulation, l use some well fitting PIR with the raw edges taped up on top of the crown board inside a shallow eke with enough room for feeding fondant if needed. Make sure you have enough ballast on the roof as the eke will not be ‘glued’ on.
 

Beebe 

Below average
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
997
Reaction score
832
Location
Scotland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Somehow it's escalated to seven.
If you look at your house you will notice that no areas are completely sealed, Kingspan for instants is left loose to allow for essential air flow. The insulation will still do its job if you leave a small gap to allow air movement.

If you are worried about moisture then use a carpet tile above a crown board, it works for me.
If you look more closely at your house you will notice that the insulation is completely sealed and that there are (should be) no air gaps. Likewise, if you plan to insulate any part of a beehive it's counterproductive to have any loosely or incompletely fitted insulation.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

International Beekeeper of Mystery
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Messages
28,554
Reaction score
6,384
Location
Glanaman,Carmarthenshire,Wales
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Too many - but not nearly enough
Can I use the Porter bee escapes to block the feeder holes? TIA
It's abouth the only thing they're good for - but the answer is no - they allow the passage of air through them. Best place for Porter escapes is in the (recycling) bin, clearing bees down from the supers is another subject, but for that, buy/make yourself a rhombus clearer board
 

DonkeyDonz 

New Bee
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
27
Reaction score
2
Location
East Sussex
Hive Type
none
It's abouth the only thing they're good for - but the answer is no - they allow the passage of air through them. Best place for Porter escapes is in the (recycling) bin, clearing bees down from the supers is another subject, but for that, buy/make yourself a rhombus clearer board
Yes, I've seen these used & agree about PBEs!
 

Patrick1 

Field Bee
***
Beekeeping Sponsor
Joined
Nov 12, 2011
Messages
544
Reaction score
412
Location
Canterbury CT4 5HW
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
300
If you look more closely at your house you will notice that the insulation is completely sealed and that there are (should be) no air gaps. Likewise, if you plan to insulate any part of a beehive it's counterproductive to have any loosely or incompletely fitted insulation.
That is totaly wrong information. Having been a property developer for almost 30 years and still own a number of properties I can categorically say ventilation is essential, look up building regs if you are not sure.
 

Beebe 

Below average
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
997
Reaction score
832
Location
Scotland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Somehow it's escalated to seven.
That is totaly wrong information. Having been a property developer for almost 30 years and still own a number of properties I can categorically say ventilation is essential, look up building regs if you are not sure.
I'm glad I don't live in one of your properties. 🥶

A building should be completely sealed between interior and exterior to the extent that some arrangements require an additional, continuous vapour barrier inboard of the insulation. Even a "cold-bridge".... a piece of building construction which is exposed on the inside and outside of a building would be designed out these days.

Depending on the design of the insulating envelope, it is often necessary to have a continuous air gap external to the insulation but PIR is always tightly jammed between studwork or ratfers....look up the Building Regs. even though you're sure. ;)
 

madasafish 

Queen Bee
***
Joined
Apr 10, 2010
Messages
10,238
Reaction score
1,581
Location
Stoke on Trent
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
6 to 8 Langstroth jumbos, a few Langstroth and National nucs.
I'm glad I don't live in one of your properties. 🥶

A building should be completely sealed between interior and exterior to the extent that some arrangements require an additional, continuous vapour barrier inboard of the insulation. Even a "cold-bridge".... a piece of building construction which is exposed on the inside and outside of a building would be designed out these days.

Depending on the design of the insulating envelope, it is often necessary to have a continuous air gap external to the insulation but PIR is always tightly jammed between studwork or ratfers....look up the Building Regs. even though you're sure. ;)

I thought eaves ventilation was required by law for some housing?
 

pargyle 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
13,802
Reaction score
4,067
Location
Fareham, Hampshire UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
I thought eaves ventilation was required by law for some housing?
Not any more ... old thinking ... but you are not required to change the arrangements in houses built when the regs suggested otherwise: 'Modern' thinking ...

 

Beebe 

Below average
***
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
997
Reaction score
832
Location
Scotland
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Somehow it's escalated to seven.
I thought eaves ventilation was required by law for some housing?
There is a requirement to provide ventilation in a roof void above the insulating layer. This also applies if there is an air-gap between the insulating layer and any external cladding. Funnily enough, this is to avoid the risk of the formation of condensation as previously practised with beehives.
 

Latest posts

Top