CBPV

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hemo

Queen Bee
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Location
West Sx, N/E corner.
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National
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4 - 7
Yesterday I found another colony suffering from the affects of CBPV, whether drifting or close placing next to the first colony that has all but failed has been partly to blame one doesn't know.
This has come at a time after I split the hive using the A/S method as the swarming process was set in place.

Again as with the first colony a more then unusual amount of dead and paralysed bees were seen in front of the hive as well as the shaking bees on the top bars, carpeted floor also removed and the hive now placed on an empty BB & eke and another small eke with entrance higher up , all other BB's and supers on top. This colony unlike the first might stand a chance as they are a lot larger in numbers but at the rate of bees dying off over the last two days one isn't too hopeful.

The first colony is doomed , the queen is still laying and only approx. 100 bees left, they are valently still flying and foraging but to little or no avail.

Time I think to burn and recycle all the affected frames and wax and start a fresh with these.

Both colonies only showing symptom 1 effects and none of the shiny black bee sympton 2 effects. Even with symptom 1 effects the bee die off is massive and the colony rapidly losses numbers on a daily basis.

Sadly the causes are little known except for maybe being stess related.
Maybe certain bee strains are more susceptable ?
 
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The AS part of this colony now with by now I hope a new emerged queen within somewhere aren't showing signs of CBPV.
I have opened them briefly one to check the marked QC had emerged and two to check on the bees, thus far no shaking bees seen and no carpet of bees on the floor or outside.
 
I have a swarm arrive that has taken up residence in my long hive at the same apiary, they are going nicely and the Q has laid up 4 frames with eggs and larvae. Fresh genetics and a different Q may be what is needed and looks like I will have to raise future colonies from this one to break the gentics cycle of my current bees.

That said my garden colony is a queen led colony from this apiary from 2021 and still with the 2021 Q heading the colony. Currently a huge colony at home on D/B and a very tall stack of supers on top.
 
Requeening with an unrelated queen often fixes it
About 12 years ago I had a couple of significant outbreaks but not a sign of it since, until this spring, when I found 2 big colonies going downhill and a few shiverers popping up in the other colonies.

The one novel factor in this apiary was the introduction last year of 10 bought queens...
 
Both colonies have the floor removed m the ground becomes the floor or the paver underneath.

I am using a spare BB & eke under another eke with an entrance but have been thinking of another woodwoork project. I will make up two 5 or 6 " high ekes with a close fitting pull out rear draw , that way one can remove the fallen dead bees much easier more often.
 
My newly arrived swarm will be the Q line I will use , the original strain I have was also a swarm collected some 4 years ago. At the time the original Q (very yellow) and offspring in that particular colony for the first two years were docile placid bees, with the further open mating the various queens have darkened and colour wise are unrecognisable to the original .

The latter matings weren't horrible and the bees in general were still quite good, I had no bad stingers or followers and colony crops were pretty good with 100 - 130lbs p.a. being a mean average over the last four years .
 
There's an idea posted on the forum previously where it's just a very slim minimalist stand under the bb.
The idea is that sick bees fall directly out into a bag on the floor and cannot infect surfaces for healthy bees to wander over.
 
About 12 years ago I had a couple of significant outbreaks but not a sign of it since, until this spring, when I found 2 big colonies going downhill and a few shiverers popping up in the other colonies.

The one novel factor in this apiary was the introduction last year of 10 bought queens...
I know they say that some Danish Buckfast have less resistance. I've never had CBPV in my Buckies but I have had it in crosses and black bees so it isn't simple is it? However it's too much of a coincidence isn't it
 
I will make up two 5 or 6 " high ekes with a close fitting pull out rear draw , that way one can remove the fallen dead bees much easier more often.
and totally missing the rationale of having no floor thus allowing the dead bees to fall to the ground
why on earth fiddle around with a spare deep and an eke
just remove the floor, put the brood box on a frameless brood box or shallow, put the whole lot on to a hive stand, the bees don't need an entrance - they have an 18" square hole where the floor used to be. They certainly don't need any twee landing platforms.
* Just a note - for this 'cure' to work you need an 'open' hive stand at least 12" high for the hive to sit on.
The theory of this system is that there is plenty of open space between the bottom of the brood nest and the floor so that the bees consider it 'outside' and don't attempt to tidy their new 'floor'
 
My understanding was to enclose the area under the open BB to prevent virus spread via robbing etc , to other colonies hence why a I use an old empty BB as a stand .
 
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My understanding was to enclose the area under the open BB to prevent virus spread via robbing etc , to other colonies hence why a I use an old empty BB as a stand .
That was never mentioned in any discussions I was privy to at the NBU and other places.
When the method was discussed, the first thing that came up was forget the 'traditional' pallet hive stand - it needs to be on legs (or similar) to make sure there is plenty of clear open space under the hive.
Then put a deep eke or shallow on the the stand
Remove the afflicted hive from it's floor
Put afflicted brood box(es) on to the eke. The eke is simply there as a bit of a windbreak to keep draughts away from the base of the brood frames.
No need for any entrance as there is no floor!
The theory being, any bees dying in the colony just drop down the cluster and thus to the ground below, this means the undertaker bees don't pick up the virus on their mandibles when clearing the dead away, and being the bees consider the ground to be 'outside' of the hive, neither the undertaker or the housekeeping bees get infected.
There is always the chance of robbing, but as with any colony, it depends how weak the colony is - but it's a risk that has to be taken.
By enclosing the space below the floorless hive, you are simply giving them a closed up hive but with a bit more than beespace under the bottom bars.
Pretty bleddy pointless.
 
I have just discovered a case of CBPV and installed it on my "funnel floor" the funnel sits on the stand with the hive on top the funnel is square with 45deg sides with 50mm exit at the bottom. Hopefully all dead bees will fall through the exit which could be defended if required.
 
I have just discovered a case of CBPV and installed it on my "funnel floor" the funnel sits on the stand with the hive on top the funnel is square with 45deg sides with 50mm exit at the bottom. Hopefully all dead bees will fall through the exit which could be defended if required.
Have you got a picture next time you’re at the bees?
 
IMG_2001.jpegIt didn’t actually take pictures as the stand hides it but these are pics of the floor when I made it.
 

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View attachment 36575It didn’t actually take pictures as the stand hides it but these are pics of the floor when I made it.
Think this is a great idea and the way to go. Several reasons. One is that this removes bees from the hive not eliminating the CBPV but reducing the number of affected bees from the hive and thus their ability to pass it on. Once they fall down the funnel they are isolated. They are not piled up on the ground where unaffected flying bees clamber over them and get infected. I am not clear whether they end up in a container which can be burnt and replaced regularly while the affected bees drop. Last and not least the distress to the beekeeper witnessing that pile of dead smelly bees is somewhat eliminated and as I said earlier, though not eliminated, a reduction in contact may shorten the infection would it not. Re-reading this it looks a little like the pandemic measures imposed during COVID................
 
I currently have cbpv in my apiary.
It’s awful, and really depressing.
Never had anything like this before.

It Started off in one very strong colony.

I took the floor off. And placed an empty super under brood box.
Hive on stand.

but as the colony weakened, some robbing started.

And now another hive is showing strong signs of infection.
It’s spread.

I like the funnel idea mentioned above.

But next time I see cbpv I suggest (to all): move infected hives quick to an isolated zone.
There’ll be less risk of drift and robbing.

My observation: is that 95% of the bees will die. When you’ve left with a handful of bees-
This would be the point to re-queen.
When the virus is raging through the colony, I think you’d be wasting £ on new queens.

It’s very depressing.

Good luck

PS all: remember to wash gloves, tools etc for it could be us the beekeepers that spreads this awful virus
 
All mine have pulled through even ones treated late. It helps having a flow on when the floor is taken away
I’ve requeened when the dead stop dropping.
I have one colony that had it last year and they still gave me honey.
 

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