wormery

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marcros 

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Has anybody ever made a wormery to make compost from kitchen scraps?

Is it straightforward enough, or one of those jobs that is easier/more cost effective to buy one?
 

VEG 

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I have been looking at these as well. Some of the ones you can buy are really expensive.
 

buzz lightyear 

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Hi, I made one out of an old WBC.lots of shreaded cardboard on the bottom, damp, then layers of old veg. I think the trick is not to put too much veg in at once. The expensive bit was the "Tiger Worms" off the net.
Buzz
 

Heather 

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Have to say I bought a wormery from Wiggly Wigglers.
It is great for composting all kitchen veg waste, and I dump paper and vacuum cleaner contents in too - so not too wet. Very slow to produce fine soil- but it is great stuff, and the water that drains off is very concentrated fertiliser liquid.
 

Poly Hive 

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I have never managed to run it properly yet. No idea what I do wrong but wrong I surely do.

Oh and the green house is now up. 10 x 8 though the auto windae thingies are proving a fiddle to fit.

PH
 
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shardy 

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Has anybody ever made a wormery to make compost from kitchen scraps?

Is it straightforward enough, or one of those jobs that is easier/more cost effective to buy one?
Hello,
this is my first post on the forum so if it goes "wonky" with the pic...my apologies :)

This is the wormery I bought last year, and I will post a more recent pic of the compost they have made for me from kitchen waste. It is a slow process but you feel really "Organic" (particularly living in the middle of a concrete jungle) when it starts to work!

2 areas of concern...getting "Cruella" to remember to put the kitchen waste in the wormery and not in the bin! and all worms are named Houdini! :willy_nilly:. But apart from that I am quite pleased with it.

 

Hombre 

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Whenever cleaning up where bags of weeds or other things have sat on concrete and accumulated dirt around them, any worms I find when I move bags etc are taken prisoner and shovelled into the top of my green compost bin. These slaves multiply well and while not a wormery per se, they appear to do a good job as I'm sure my bin doesn't really reach proper composting temperatures, so the worm assist is very beneficial.

Don't delay, take prisoners today. :)
Alas, slugs enjoy the environment too.
 

Geoff 

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You won't get up to proper composting temperatures at home. You really need a commercial scale operation to do that. What we tend to use at home is cold composting which takes longer. I understand that a lot of slugs that go in the compost bin tend to be scavenger species that eat dead material so are useful decomposers - those big horrible ones that give you the eeby jeebies when you open the compost bin lid. The nasty little ones that eat our plants tend to be the little white ones and of course there are the horrible little black keel slugs that burrow down and eat our spuds.
 

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