Quantcast

Swarm comtrol & mite control

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
25,616
Reaction score
175
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
.
Bram Cornelissen & Lonne Gerritsen
Applied Plant Research (PPO), Bee Unit, PO Box 69, 6700 AB Wageningen, The
Netherlands,

In 2004 and 2005 experiments were carried out to test the efficacy and
efficiency of Varroa control combined with swarm prevention methods
in spring. Honey bee colonies were split in an artificial swarm and a
brood carrier. Hereafter the swarms were treated with oxalic acid and
the brood carriers either with formic acid (2004) or Thymovar (2005).
Both the oxalic acid and the formic acid were very effective, resulting
in an average efficacy of 97% and 96%, respectively. There was some
worker bee mortality in both treatments. Thymovar was less effective
(71%), but did not cause any worker bee mortality. The results show
that the combination of Varroa control and swarm prevention can
effectively be used in spring
 

jimbeekeeper 

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 14, 2008
Messages
2,470
Reaction score
1
Location
East Yorkshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
1
I can follow what you are saying, and I am practised in AS, but are you preforming this before the natural desire to swarm?

If so are you introducing new queen to brood section or letting them build emergency queen?
 

Polyanwood 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 7, 2008
Messages
2,203
Reaction score
1
Location
London
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
45
Are you both saying that we should treat prophylactically in the Spring with OA or Formic acid when we do artificial swarm, or are you saying that you should monitor mite drop and only do this if it is high???
 

jimbeekeeper 

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 14, 2008
Messages
2,470
Reaction score
1
Location
East Yorkshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
1
Are you both saying that we should treat prophylactically
Hang on while I google it.

pro?phy?lac?tic (prf-lktk, prf-)
adj.
Acting to defend against or prevent something, especially disease; protective.
n.
1. A prophylactic agent, device, or measure, such as a vaccine or drug.
2. A contraceptive device, especially a condom.
[French prophylactique, from Greek prophulaktikos, from prophulassein, to take precautions against : pro-, before; see pro-2 + phulassein, to protect (from phulax, guard).]
prophy?lacti?cal?ly adv.
 

Polyanwood 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 7, 2008
Messages
2,203
Reaction score
1
Location
London
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
45
That is correct Jim. You take the condom - be careful not to snag it with your nails - them you put in 20ml of formic acid and swing it as fast as possible above your head to make it vapourise. At the same time you blow up two more condoms and block the entrance.

Then you quickly insert the vapourised formic acid into the hive.:rofl:
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
25,616
Reaction score
175
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
I but are you preforming this before the natural desire to swarm?

If so are you introducing new queen to brood section or letting them build emergency queen?

No, and that was not the point.
And if you succeed in winter trickling, you need that at all.

.
 

jimbeekeeper 

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 14, 2008
Messages
2,470
Reaction score
1
Location
East Yorkshire
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
1
That is correct Jim. You take the condom - be careful not to snag it with your nails - them you put in 20ml of formic acid and swing it as fast as possible above your head to make it vapourise. At the same time you blow up two more condoms and block the entrance.

Then you quickly insert the vapourised formic acid into the hive.:rofl:
Wow, some people would pay good money for the service you describe above. :cheers2:
 

axeman 

New Bee
Joined
Nov 10, 2008
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
No you do not introduce a queen,this would defeat the whole object of the exercise.
 
Last edited:
Top