Some days I should not get up...

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Yesterday the hot water tap in our downstairs toilet failed. The cold one stopped working a fair while ago. They're really quite old and I suspect just have so much wear on the mechanism now that they just won't close properly. Last time I replaced the seals the taps were clearly not in great shape.

My wife picked up a couple of new taps this morning and I happily started on what really shouldn't be more than a half hour job to replace the old ones. Only the backnuts on each of the taps seem to have been sealed on somehow to the point where they won't actually turn. Even applying enough force to bend the basin wrench they just wouldn't budge. The tails of the taps are too long to fit a socket over and there's no room to work with anything bigger, so in desperation I thought I'd turn the tap body itself out of the nut instead. Only the tap won't shift either. Ok, so I'll tap it with a soft hammer. Still no movement. Tapped it a bit harder, and the sink suddenly cracked right across the hole for the tap, though the tap itself still won't move. Still, that's not a problem any more because now we need a new sink as well :( And the sink is in a bespoke unit made specifically to fit it, so that needs replacing. And then there's the panelling that covers up the pipework, which is attached to the sink unit and the panelling behind the toilet.

So what was a thirty minute job is now a week's work plus the purchase of a load of new sanitaryware. At least we can take the taps back to Screwfix and I can fit the mixer tap that it would have made sense to have in the first place.

Or perhaps I'll just build a compost toilet...

James
 
I thought you said you dropped the hammer on the sink..... Luckily it may be covered by house insurance to get a professional to do the job!
 
I thought you said you dropped the hammer on the sink..... Luckily it may be covered by house insurance to get a professional to do the job!

No dropping of the hammer. It was only a lightweight rawhide one anyhow. I guess whatever was used to seal the hole that the tap fits into is much stronger than the ceramic of the basin so that gave way first. I've no idea what was actually used though. It's bonded so hard that I'm wondering if it's epoxy. I don't understand why that would even be necessary though. There's no need to have them fixed so tight and modern taps often have plastic backnuts as a result.

Now the damage is done I'm half-tempted to get some stilsons on the other one to see if they will do the job.

In the end I guess it is only bringing forward the inevitable. The entire room needed redoing at some point anyhow. I've just been putting it off because my wife wants a close-coupled back-to-wall toilet and that's going to be a pig to deal with because that part of the house is built of rough stone and the walls aren't remotely true in any direction.

James
 
No dropping of the hammer. It was only a lightweight rawhide one anyhow. I guess whatever was used to seal the hole that the tap fits into is much stronger than the ceramic of the basin so that gave way first. I've no idea what was actually used though. It's bonded so hard that I'm wondering if it's epoxy. I don't understand why that would even be necessary though. There's no need to have them fixed so tight and modern taps often have plastic backnuts as a result.

Now the damage is done I'm half-tempted to get some stilsons on the other one to see if they will do the job.

In the end I guess it is only bringing forward the inevitable. The entire room needed redoing at some point anyhow. I've just been putting it off because my wife wants a close-coupled back-to-wall toilet and that's going to be a pig to deal with because that part of the house is built of rough stone and the walls aren't remotely true in any direction.

James

No, I agree with @enrico, I'm sure I heard you say that you dropped a hammer on the sink. For clarity, I don't think you were trying to repair it; weren't you putting up a mirror above it? ;)
 
This is similar scenario I found myself in a while back. I am sure you will have 15mm pipes and suggest you use a flexi pipe from inlet to the tap. Also consider lever taps too as you will avoid the danger of overtightening and leaks. Advancing years and stiff hands will mean the taps are a doddle to turn on and off too.
 
I hate all things plumbing. You have my every sympathy.
 
Yesterday the hot water tap in our downstairs toilet failed. The cold one stopped working a fair while ago. They're really quite old and I suspect just have so much wear on the mechanism now that they just won't close properly. Last time I replaced the seals the taps were clearly not in great shape.

My wife picked up a couple of new taps this morning and I happily started on what really shouldn't be more than a half hour job to replace the old ones. Only the backnuts on each of the taps seem to have been sealed on somehow to the point where they won't actually turn. Even applying enough force to bend the basin wrench they just wouldn't budge. The tails of the taps are too long to fit a socket over and there's no room to work with anything bigger, so in desperation I thought I'd turn the tap body itself out of the nut instead. Only the tap won't shift either. Ok, so I'll tap it with a soft hammer. Still no movement. Tapped it a bit harder, and the sink suddenly cracked right across the hole for the tap, though the tap itself still won't move. Still, that's not a problem any more because now we need a new sink as well :( And the sink is in a bespoke unit made specifically to fit it, so that needs replacing. And then there's the panelling that covers up the pipework, which is attached to the sink unit and the panelling behind the toilet.

So what was a thirty minute job is now a week's work plus the purchase of a load of new sanitaryware. At least we can take the taps back to Screwfix and I can fit the mixer tap that it would have made sense to have in the first place.

Or perhaps I'll just build a compost toilet...

James
Personally I'd have fitted a pair of universal tap revivers and left the bottom part of the taps well alone. Note you might need to rectify the seat.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/31344314...dqAivo3SaG&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY
 
Personally I'd have fitted a pair of universal tap revivers and left the bottom part of the taps well alone. Note you might need to rectify the seat.
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/31344314...dqAivo3SaG&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY
Nothing beats shutting the door after the sink has bolted !

My past life is littered with those 'if only I knew now ...' moments. I have much empathy with James ... like the day I needed to get to the pipework under the landing floorboards, set my circular saw depth to 18mm (the thickness of the chipboard floor) ran the saw down the joint of the boards so that I could release them ... only to find that some idiot plumber had placed the main hot water feed with the copper pipe tight up against the underside of the flooring and the flooring was only 17.5mm deep ... the fountain of hot water, under pressure, with my electric saw still going and me not sure which valves to turn off to stop the deluge is an image that haunts me .... and the water damage to the ceiling below .... If only ....
 
Yesterday the hot water tap in our downstairs toilet failed. The cold one stopped working a fair while ago. They're really quite old and I suspect just have so much wear on the mechanism now that they just won't close properly. Last time I replaced the seals the taps were clearly not in great shape.

My wife picked up a couple of new taps this morning and I happily started on what really shouldn't be more than a half hour job to replace the old ones. Only the backnuts on each of the taps seem to have been sealed on somehow to the point where they won't actually turn. Even applying enough force to bend the basin wrench they just wouldn't budge. The tails of the taps are too long to fit a socket over and there's no room to work with anything bigger, so in desperation I thought I'd turn the tap body itself out of the nut instead. Only the tap won't shift either. Ok, so I'll tap it with a soft hammer. Still no movement. Tapped it a bit harder, and the sink suddenly cracked right across the hole for the tap, though the tap itself still won't move. Still, that's not a problem any more because now we need a new sink as well :( And the sink is in a bespoke unit made specifically to fit it, so that needs replacing. And then there's the panelling that covers up the pipework, which is attached to the sink unit and the panelling behind the toilet.

So what was a thirty minute job is now a week's work plus the purchase of a load of new sanitaryware. At least we can take the taps back to Screwfix and I can fit the mixer tap that it would have made sense to have in the first place.

Or perhaps I'll just build a compost toilet...

James
Feeling your pain James! I find an angle grinder cures most ills !
 
I'd suggest not trying to defraud your insurers, or indeed encouraging others to do so.

Many years ago; I made my only ever home insurance claim. A small pan of cooking oil had been left on the hob whilst I was in the garden, and this had (for want of a better word), sublimated to greasy, black smoke, and coated all of the walls and ceilings of the bungalow.
The assessor came round and asked me if there had been a fire. I honestly said that there hadn't been.
" I'm sure you said you saw flames." he said. "That was the weird thing, there weren't any," said I. "But there must have been, or otherwise you wouldn't be able to claim for fire damage." was his response.
So obviously, I revised my story, which sorted the problem.
I wouldn't recommend claiming on fairly small items and making any false claim would be unwise.....but I was emulating my insurance man and joining in the spirit of a bit of fun. 😀
 
No dropping of the hammer. It was only a lightweight rawhide one anyhow. I guess whatever was used to seal the hole that the tap fits into is much stronger than the ceramic of the basin so that gave way first. I've no idea what was actually used though. It's bonded so hard that I'm wondering if it's epoxy. I don't understand why that would even be necessary though. There's no need to have them fixed so tight and modern taps often have plastic backnuts as a result.

Now the damage is done I'm half-tempted to get some stilsons on the other one to see if they will do the job.

In the end I guess it is only bringing forward the inevitable. The entire room needed redoing at some point anyhow. I've just been putting it off because my wife wants a close-coupled back-to-wall toilet and that's going to be a pig to deal with because that part of the house is built of rough stone and the walls aren't remotely true in any direction.

James
You could go abit more fancy and have a concealed cistern, that way you build a stud wall and have a nice flat surface to work from, depending on space available. We fitted out a thousand ish year old building that way but neither money nor space where an issue for the customer.
 
When you start pricing things up the insurance may seem a better option.
 

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