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East Yorks New Bee 

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Well folks, I now understand when people told me that your own honey tastes like nothing else.Extracted my first ever honey today, to call it food of the gods is to do it an injustice. The wife and kids didn't like honey until they tasted our own honey. I don't think my ladies have done bad for me, I got them as five frame nuc in June, by the middle of July it had grow so big I took a nuc off it, and now they have give me approx twenty pounds of honey (I wasn't expecting to get any this year) :hurray::hurray::hurray:
 

Black Comb 

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Well done.
Got my first nuc same time as you but no honey this year for me.

You've had better weather over to the east - that's my excuse anyway.
 

oliver90owner 

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I know it is early in the morning for the whole of this post but here goes.

Don't let it distract you from getting your colonies through the next hoop - the winter.

Well done to anyone who gets a crop in the first year; just need to finish this first year on a high, and then await the real problem of next year - how to process all that honey you will get from a thriving full colony in a full season (or more if your colonies are multiplying like eynb's).

Only one thing wrong with your own home-produced honey - it's moorish (morish? or more-ish?) - especially for those that live there (wake up - on the moors!).

Regards, RAB
 

JCBrum 

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o90o > Only one thing wrong with your own home-produced honey - it's moorish (morish? or more-ish?) - <


I'm thinking of trying Amish ;)
 

thedeaddiplomat 

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sadly, no more!
Please accept congratulations from a jealous fellow newbee. My girls have been working their little socks off all summer, but have not laid down enough to make it worth harvesting this time round.

But there's always next year...

:banghead::banghead:
 

Widdershins 

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Its just SO exciting when you extract your first (...or any, I imagine!) Honey crop - puts the rubbish they sell in the shops to shame doesnt it?! :cheers2:
 

oliver90owner 

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But there's always next year...

Exactly! Getting through the first year is always difficult. One piece of advice for the second is 'take your time'. My biggest failure was expanding too quickly in that second year. Well, trying to - the first year was an easy one; the next was much more difficult and I ended it almost back where I started (at the start of the third season). Took lots more honey and lost lots more bees!
 

GingerNut 

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Having now tasted it................there is no comparison with shop bought :)

Just waiting for the fresh baked cheese and herb bread to finish..............and guess what we're having on that??????????????????????????????:cheers2:

Yours Roy
 

East Yorks New Bee 

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I know it is early in the morning for the whole of this post but here goes.

Don't let it distract you from getting your colonies through the next hoop - the winter.
Well done to anyone who gets a crop in the first year; just need to finish this first year on a high, and then await the real problem of next year - how to process all that honey you will get from a thriving full colony in a full season (or more if your colonies are multiplying like eynb's).

Only one thing wrong with your own home-produced honey - it's moorish (morish? or more-ish?) - especially for those that live there (wake up - on the moors!).

Regards, RAB
That was one of the reasons that when the colony got big enough I took a nuc off it, to give me more chance of getting some if not all my colonies through the winter.I was more worried about getting through the winter than gettting any honey this year.
 

ribblesbees 

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Well done EYNB for your honey. We also got ours this June but from the start, it was felt that getting them strong enough to get through winter was the priority. Next year would be soon enough for honey. :)

Still envious of having home-made honey to eat tho. :ack2:

bee-smillie
 

Norton 

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Without doubt these first crops of honey are the finest honey that the beekeeper has ever tasted!......
Have fun
Norton
 

Hebeegeebee 

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Ivy honey is not so nice. I took some off last year after a really good autumn. An "acquired taste" some say. Others say it's horrible. Very strong and taints food if it's used in cooking. IMO it's best left for the bees!
 

Hivemaker. 

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Ivy honey,i don't even think its best left for the bee's,better to feed them before it starts.
 

DrNick 

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Well done EYNB, as ribble says, our priority is to get the bees through this first year and winter, our only real problem has been that after buying a second queen (to give us more options) and dividing the colony, they decided it would be a good idea to swarm, so an artificial swarm was needed, which has left us with two strong colonies and one weak one, we could unite the weak one with one of the others but I think we will be looking to put the two smallest colonies in one brood box with a divider in so they can help keep each other warm, and keep out fingers crossed.
 

Onge 

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My wife and children didn't like honey until they tried the real stuff.

I think that is the same for a lot of people.

I keep a taster jar in the van just incase. :driving:

Once they have tasted it. ;)
 

ribblesbees 

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Well done EYNB for your honey. We also got ours this June but from the start, it was felt that getting them strong enough to get through winter was the priority. Next year would be soon enough for honey. :)

Still envious of having home-made honey to eat tho. :ack2:

bee-smillie
OK I know what I posted, but I couldn't resist just having a taste of what the little ladies had produced. On the last inspection, a frame was withdrawn and a small amount of comb honey sampled. And yes, there is nothing quite like the first honey your bees have produced.

The ladies still have plenty left.


bee-smillie
 

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