Automotive honey

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Sep 4, 2011
Messages
5,502
Reaction score
5,070
Location
Wiveliscombe
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
24
Whilst I was disrobing after visiting an apiary today I was approached and asked if I had any honey for sale. Not in the car when I'm doing inspections, as it happens. But it made me think that perhaps I should keep a few jars in the vehicle, not just when I'm out doing inspections, but all the time, so my wife can sell some when she's out and about too.

Obviously however there are a couple of days in the year when the inside of the car gets a touch warmer than one might like for the storage of honey. Does anyone else do this and concern themselves with the honey being overheated? How do you prevent it? Some sort of cool box?

James
 
Last edited:
Whilst I was disrobing after visiting an apiary today I was approached and asked if I had any honey for sale. Not in the car when I'm doing inspections, as it happens. But it made me think that perhaps I should keep a few jars in the vehicle, not just when I'm out doing inspections, but all the time, so my wife can sell some when she's out and about too.

Obviously however there are a couple of days in the year when the inside of the car gets a touch warmer than one might like for the storage of honey. Does anyone else do this and concern themselves with the honey being overheated? How do you prevent it? Some sort of cool box?

James
When I was a kid... the family had something like this in the back of the car almost always: 8 Litre 12V In-Car Electric Coolbox
It was a long long time ago - in a country far far away....

It probably wouldn't be a set and forget thing depending on your car & how often you drive; as some aux power sockets in a car are only powered with the ignition and others are always on. If always on I'd also look at a low voltage disconnect so that no matter how long the car was parked - you'd still be able to start it. In the UK there doesn't seem to be a ready made device that I could easily find... but if you are into tinkering you can get the gubbins off of ebay.

In my youth - I also remember weeping canvas cooling bags hanging off cars (mainly for cooling water) - but some were bigger with pockets for cooling miscellaneous items. Might not work in the UK - to work would require a sunny day.
desert-water-bag-elaine-haberland.jpg



An easier option would probably be a wad of Business Cards with contact details - so as if someone is interested they can contact you later to pay and collect?
 
In my youth - I also remember weeping canvas cooling bags hanging off cars (mainly for cooling water) - but some were bigger with pockets for cooling miscellaneous items. Might not work in the UK - to work would require a sunny day.
often use the same kind of thing over here for carrying the catch whilst fishing, either hessian bags or other lightweight but absorbent material, get them nice and wet then remove from the source of water (as that tends to slow cook the contents), the inside of the bags were always nice and cool.
 
I still have a 12v car cool box but it only blows air between an outer and the inner box and it doesn't work when you turn the ignition off unless you have a socket that stays live. To be honest it wasn't much good but it might be enough to keep honey at an even temperature if you have a live socket.
 
Whilst I was disrobing after visiting an apiary today I was approached and asked if I had any honey for sale. Not in the car when I'm doing inspections, as it happens. But it made me think that perhaps I should keep a few jars in the vehicle, not just when I'm out doing inspections, but all the time, so my wife can sell some when she's out and about too.

Obviously however there are a couple of days in the year when the inside of the car gets a touch warmer than one might like for the storage of honey. Does anyone else do this and concern themselves with the honey being overheated? How do you prevent it? Some sort of cool box?

James
I would have thought that an ordinary coolbox would be sufficient (even on very hot days) to keep the jars of honey below a temperature that would do anything other than make it a bit runny. An inner box made out of celotex would probably be belt and braces .. you are only going to have half a dozen jars as 'i have some in the car' stock.
 
I find that the boot tends to remain cooler than the rest of the vehicle so perhaps put it there wrapped in a spare jumper/coat.
 
Since the car wasn't supplied with a spare wheel (as many aren't these days), that might actually be a useful way to use the wheel well.

James
Even with a space saver the rest usually a well within the wheel which can hold a few jars.
 
It's actually a good idea - I often get asked at work if I have any honey and I usually take it in the following day .. but, a pound in the hand is worth two in the purse - if all I have to do is nip out to the car park to grab a jar ... can't think why I didn't think about keeping a jar or two in the car.
 
Whilst I was disrobing after visiting an apiary today I was approached and asked if I had any honey for sale. Not in the car when I'm doing inspections, as it happens. But it made me think that perhaps I should keep a few jars in the vehicle, not just when I'm out doing inspections, but all the time, so my wife can sell some when she's out and about too.

Obviously however there are a couple of days in the year when the inside of the car gets a touch warmer than one might like for the storage of honey. Does anyone else do this and concern themselves with the honey being overheated? How do you prevent it? Some sort of cool box?

James
I had the same thing g happen. As it happened I had a jar in the car.
 
My wife insists on keeping a rug in the car for those cooler days but during the hot summer I wrap any jars I'm transporting in it so it doesn't over heat. It even stops set melting!
 

Latest posts

Back
Top