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Alternative food sources and the effects they have on our bees.

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Murox 

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How on earth did wild bees manage to survive millions of years without that witches brew?
AND
They chose to colonise areas of natural forage. If forage became unavailable, e.g due to climatic conditions, the bees didn't survive in that particular environment.

Today's managed colonies have no choice where the beekeeper puts them. If they are put in a nutritional desert, they are either artificially fed or they die out.
The words 'stewardship of the land' seem to pop into my mind.
 

Gilberdyke John 

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They chose to colonise areas of natural forage. If forage became unavailable, e.g due to climatic conditions, the bees didn't survive in that particular environment.

Today's managed colonies have no choice where the beekeeper puts them. If they are put in a nutritional desert, they are either artificially fed or they die out.
Did you actually read the list of stuff I commented on?
 

Little_bees 

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Did you actually read the list of stuff I commented on?
Yes, I did read the list of stuff and stand by my comment.

The poster said that he was taking all steps he felt were needed in his environment for his bees to thrive (not just survive).

Almost half of the amino acids in the list are considered non-essential (e.g can be synthesized by the bees) but that doesn't mean they can't be included. They are found in pollen naturally available to bees and are beneficial.

Similarly the list of vitamins/minerals are probably not all added by him individually. For example he lists the B complex vitamins available in brewers yeast as separate vitamins.

My point to you is that the managed honeybees of today are not living in the environment of the wild bees of millennia past. And if the natural forage available to the poster's colonies in the part of the world where he happens to live is deficient, then well done to him for putting in the work to provide for their optimum health.
 

Antipodes 

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How long is winter in Australia that bees do not get Food from flowers? Finland has 9 months such time that hives live with sugar.

Other nutrients bees get from pollen or from fat body.

Honey wintering is not an alternative. 20 kg sugar in winter is 12€/hive. No idea to feed hives with 10 times more expencive honey.

I mean. You have in Australia your own world.

Australia is a big country....from the tropics to the desert to icy islands.
 

Antipodes 

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What you do is feed bananas apparently, like Finman says. Just one banana per hive. Simon Valkenberg, 22mins.

 

Finman 

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What you do is feed bananas apparently, like Finman says. Just one banana per hive. Simon
I mentioned a banana as an example, how mad ideas people get.

Banana has 13% sugar and 1% protein. When you count the sugar kilo price to banana, it is extremely expencive.

Yes, there are writings about banana as bee food, but those guys do not understand at all bee nutrition.

Optimal protein food to bees has 20% protein. And to give sugar to bees, give sugar.

When bees move 2:1 syrup from feeding box to combs, they spend 24% out of original sugar in prosessing. So you see, 13% sugar content is too light.
 
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Nige.Coll 

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Bakers yeast is an old additive to bee feed to promote laying and build up.
 

Angry_Mob 

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But does it work?
As posted earlier in the thread by madasafish it would appear so: A Comparative Test Of The Pollen Subs (Part 1 & 2) - Scientific Beekeeping

Also, the protein content at 20% doesn't appear to be an important factor, from the study Randy calculates natural pollen to be about 9.1% protein and it outperformed everything else including the ultra bee at 20% protein which in turn performed quite similarly to the mega and beepro which are about 13.5% protein.
 

Finman 

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But does it work?
it Works, if you have real pollen with it. I use for example 1 part soya flour - 1 part irradiated pollen - 2 parts dry yeast.

I have not succeeded to feed those proteins without pollen. - even if many have said that they have managed without pollen.

You cannot use much soya becauce it makes patty hard.
 

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