winter feeding

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Rock_Chick

House Bee
Joined
Jan 3, 2009
Messages
234
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Location
Lancs
Hive Type
National
I went into hives On saturday,to put on some wet suppers(I took these off about a month ago)Both hives had anough stores,but one now has very little stores I can only think they've been robbed out.Question is at this time of year how can I feed them.
with thanks
:confused:
 
.
If they bring pollen outside, you can feed them with strong syrup.

I had last night -10C.
 
sorry to hijack but i feed my girls about 12 ltr of sugar syrup a week ago on monday and they have almost gone through it,should i give them somemore or leave well alone,they have plenty of stores in the bb??
:cheers2:
 
sorry to hijack

Not really or you would have started another thread!

12 ltr of sugar syrup a week ago

One colony or two, each or both?

Type of feeder - is it (if one) leaking?

Colony strength?

They will stop taking it when the comb is full and there is nowhere to put it, or the weather turns too cold.

Original thread

As Finman says.

Stealing supers in October (esp. as far north as in Yorkshire) is always a risk and would need very careful consideration if it were me doing it.

Colony strength, weather and brood quantity would need assessing carefully. You may now have a strong colony after them feeding a large amount of larvae using only stores in the brood box (with not good enough weather or forage, of late, to replenish the stores used for brood production and fill the comb vacated by the hatching bees.

If they had been robbed out there will likely be few bees as the colony must have been weak for it not to be able to resist the robbing (or too large an entrance).

If it is weak in bees, you are in trouble - reduce the hive volume and feed the whole winter with candy, or cut your losses, unite and make one very strong colony from the two.

We all have to learn that we can only take the surplus - if the former is true - and we must make sure that colonies are both strong and well-fed going into winter. I rarely take late stores unless it is for redistribution to other colonies. Better that it is there in the spring and available for redistribution then, than risking shortages in the winter.

Sorry if this is now obvious but it may be a good lesson for new beeks.

Regards, RAB
 
im sorry rab did i make you get out the wrong side of the bed to have some input to my question if so, dont bother in future stay in bed
regards mark
 
Mark - sometimes 'text speak' can be misinterpreted. I'm sure RAB didn't mean you any offence in his response.

There's some good advice in his reply that all of us could take notice of.

All the best and good beekeeping.
 
please show the text speak that you refer too??wpc,i thought asked a perfectly valid question and out of politeness said sorry for the hijack,i dont need the sour puss treatment,just a simple answer to the question will suffice
 
I think what Rab is saying Mark is that you haven't posted enough information to allow him to give a comprehensive anwer.

Why don't you start a new thread?
 
Last edited:
I think what Rab is saying Mark is that you haven't posted enough information to allow him to give a comprehensive anwer.
That makes him a bit of a guesser and he could have left it for someone else instead of displaying his feelings. Fairly simple I would have thought. Nice to know that there are a number of apologists around to smooth out the abrasive bits. :)
 
Just found a red handbag in this thread,did anyone drop it in the scuffle?
 
Capri,
Finman gave you one option (post 2 of this thread). Another option is fondant placed directly on the top bars of the brood box. I would clear and remove the supers whether cleaned or not, at this time of year they are just "vain space" as Finman would say.
:cheers2: Mike
 
Capri,
Finman gave you one option (post 2 of this thread). Another option is fondant placed directly on the top bars of the brood box. I would clear and remove the supers whether cleaned or not, at this time of year they are just "vain space" as Finman would say.
:cheers2: Mike

Sorry didn't mean to be ungrateful,yes there was one sensible answer.
How long would Fondant last ?
 
That would depend on the temperature and number of bees in the hive.
I have some hives that can take down around 8lb of fondant in a week.

What weight of fondant block do you have?
 
How long would Fondant last

Firstly, sorry, I thought there were two sensible replies.

How long? That depends on lots of things.

How much? 12.5kg should be enough, but may not.

Why? Because we don't know what the winter is going to be like, the strength of your colony, the size of your beetainer and the insulation/ventilation arrangements, the site topography, how much stores are actually available already and whether you intend feeding strong syrup now, and lastly, when the winter might actually arrive.

For instance I saw bees taking in pollen, at least - on the winter solstice and Christmas Eve last year.

Let us know how strong or weak they are. I am of the opinion that uniting may be the best option for you but can not be sure, of course. How strong is the other colony? I have learned from experience that weak colonies are more of a problem than their worth and you may be at risk of losing both if the winter is severe.

One strong colony is worth more than two weak ones, the weak colony may be poor due to a failing queen and not survive anyway - in which case you may not need much fondant at all!

So you will need to monitor the usage and add more if/as necesssary.

Regards, RAB
 

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