Stonebrood?

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Jul 20, 2019
Messages
68
Reaction score
27
Location
Fife
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
6
I know is rare, this hive never made it into Spring, first full inspection today, weather, temperature not been suitable till now. A few foragers , some capped brood , some stores, no queen, and most frames have 40-50 cells with white chalky cells. No mummies , seen chalk brood before , looks more like Stonebrood? Anyway, burning frames and sterilising boxes and kit IMG_2710.jpeg
 
I know is rare, this hive never made it into Spring, first full inspection today, weather, temperature not been suitable till now. A few foragers , some capped brood , some stores, no queen, and most frames have 40-50 cells with white chalky cells. No mummies , seen chalk brood before , looks more like Stonebrood? Anyway, burning frames and sterilising boxes and kit View attachment 39764
Take care not to breathe in dust etc. Maybe wear a mask. Stonebrood is the one bee disease which can affect us (our lungs).
 
I know is rare, this hive never made it into Spring, first full inspection today, weather, temperature not been suitable till now. A few foragers , some capped brood , some stores, no queen, and most frames have 40-50 cells with white chalky cells. No mummies , seen chalk brood before , looks more like Stonebrood? Anyway, burning frames and sterilising boxes and kit View attachment 39764
Sometimes ... even when you think the worst ... it's a good idea to take a step back, pause, and think about what is going on. Stonebrood is very rare in the UK and if you find it then it will, generally, be accompanied by other symptoms and the affected cells will be in an area of brood. Pollen tends to be stored on the periphery of the comb as can be seen in your photo .. JBM is right - mouldy pollen cells. Not uncommon in spring. Hopefully the frames are not yet ablaze !
 
so rare it wasn't even mentioned in our DASH training, it's not even on Beebase
I'd only heard about it when a fellow beekeeper down here mentioned he had seen it last spring ... I had to look it up ... I suspect that (as in this case) that it was either chalk brood or mouldy pollen !
 
I know is rare, this hive never made it into Spring, first full inspection today, weather, temperature not been suitable till now. A few foragers , some capped brood , some stores, no queen, and most frames have 40-50 cells with white chalky cells. No mummies , seen chalk brood before , looks more like Stonebrood? Anyway, burning frames and sterilising boxes and kit View attachment 39764
I've never encountered stonebrood either in reality or in print so it seems it's very rare. It did give me a chuckle as it brought to mind the episode of last of the summer wine where a Stone Worm infestation was invented by Howard.
 
John Gilberdyke- thans for your comment- stonebrood is not in same book as Nessie, and if you did look at my original brood picture and compared it with the stonebrood pictures in scientificbeekeeping.co.uk you will see just how closely the resemble each other.
 

Attachments

  • stonebrood.png
    stonebrood.png
    450.5 KB · Views: 0
https://europepmc.org/article/PMC/3816652

Standard methods for fungal brood disease research.​

2. Stonebrood​

2.1. Introduction​

Stonebrood is a very rare honey bee brood disease caused by several fungi from the genus Aspergillus. The disease was first described by Massen (1906) and has since then been found worldwide. Aspergillus flavus has most frequently been reported, followed by Asp. fumigatus, but also Asp. niger and other species can kill honey bees (Gilliam and Vandenberg, 1997). Aspergillus is able to infect the host through the gut if the spores are ingested, but also through the cuticle. Therefore, adults as well as larvae and pupae can become infected. In addition, most species of Aspergillus produce aflatoxins that have been suggested to be the primary cause of death in stonebrood infected honey bees (Burnside, 1930). However, a non-aflatoxin producing Asp. flavus strain has been observed to induce stonebrood symptoms equally well in in vitro reared honey bee larvae as afaltoxin producing strains (Vojvodic, unpublished).
 
Spring, first full inspection today, weather, temperature not been suitable till now. A few foragers , some capped brood , some stores, no queen, and most frames have 40-50 cells with white chalky cells. No mummies , seen

That is molded pollen.

Rub the molden points away

Cut away the white stuff and you find pollen from the cell
 
Last edited:
I'd only heard about it when a fellow beekeeper down here mentioned he had seen it last spring ... I had to look it up ... I suspect that (as in this case) that it was either chalk brood or mouldy pollen !

Propably you have not seen chalk brood. Lucky you pargyle.

and most beekeepers have not seen mouldy pollen.
 
Propably you have not seen chalk brood. Lucky you pargyle.

and most beekeepers have not seen mouldy pollen.
Well Finny ... I've seen both chalkbrood and mouldy pollen .... but I'd never even heard of Stonebrood and had to look it up. About as rare as a Finman compliment !
 
determined to be the only person in the UK with stonebrood aren't we?
What is this forum about again? O yes over-self opinionated people who have years of expert knowledge who use it to belittle and berate others with less years experience. What a positive message to give to any new beekeepers unfortunate enough to risk asking any questions or queries , shame to see , never mind it’s nice to be nice , unless your not . Don’t worry I won’t bother you experts again 😀
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Back
Top