PhD opportunity

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Wilco

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Anyone interested in doing a PhD in computer modelling of bee (not just honey bee) diseases?

If so, take a look here.

As it's a PhD, the stipend isn't taxable meaning, if you have time for extra work, you can still earn up to your full tax allowance before you have to pay tax- if you can find something which allows you to do that, it means the potential to take home just over 30k a year tax free.
 
Some of that looks like it could be fun, though my maths is probably no longer strong enough (stats never was my idea of fun) and the remuneration wouldn't even begin to cover my living costs :D

I'm quite shocked I have to admit, given that my son is already signed up to do an MSc. next year and has a strong desire to follow that with a PhD, at how little PhD students are paid, unless of course the academic concept of "full time" is somewhat less than 37.5 hours a week, 46 weeks per year. Do most of them tend to have additional jobs?

James
 
Some of that looks like it could be fun, though my maths is probably no longer strong enough (stats never was my idea of fun) and the remuneration wouldn't even begin to cover my living costs :D

I'm quite shocked I have to admit, given that my son is already signed up to do an MSc. next year and has a strong desire to follow that with a PhD, at how little PhD students are paid, unless of course the academic concept of "full time" is somewhat less than 37.5 hours a week, 46 weeks per year. Do most of them tend to have additional jobs?

James
I'll have to ask them regarding jobs. To be honest, it's still more than a lot of people earn, especially when the stipend is tax free. Its equivalent to about £22,000 if they were paying taxes IIUC. Factor a beekeepers hourly rate in and the PhD students are doing ok even if it is pants for a graduate.

There are often opportunities for for them to assist with various teaching sessions too which pays better per hour than I did as a vet although obviously isn't a long term option.
 
Academically that does look an attractive project. I remember my PhD stipend in 1974 -1977 was £600 per annum paid quarterly. Initially in each quarter I lived like a king for a month, normally for a month and like a pauper for a month. I got my PhD but it did not take the full three years to learn how to manage money sensibly - probably one of the most valuable lessons for me given that a year after I finished the mortgage rates shot up to 15% just after I bought my first house - ouch!!! Of course there were no credit cards then.
 
Some of that looks like it could be fun, though my maths is probably no longer strong enough (stats never was my idea of fun) and the remuneration wouldn't even begin to cover my living costs :D

I'm quite shocked I have to admit, given that my son is already signed up to do an MSc. next year and has a strong desire to follow that with a PhD, at how little PhD students are paid, unless of course the academic concept of "full time" is somewhat less than 37.5 hours a week, 46 weeks per year. Do most of them tend to have additional jobs?

James
There are lies. There are damned lies. Then there are statistics! I think that's attributed to Churchill but I could be mistaken 🤔
 
There are lies. There are damned lies. Then there are statistics! I think that's attributed to Churchill but I could be mistaken 🤔
you are - Mark Twain popularised it, attributing it to Disraeli, but it was around before that - maybe Arthur Wellesley
 

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