Quantcast

First sting of the year

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

jenkinsbrynmair 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 30, 2011
Messages
24,728
Reaction score
1,990
Location
Glanaman,Carmarthenshire,Wales
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
Too many - but not nearly enough
Perhaps the sting site became infected?
Heard of a few incidences lately where infection rather than a systemic reaction was the problem
Theoretically after a couple of days I suppose but in my friend's case and probably Brendan's the antibiotic was given acutely = shortly after the sting ie. before 'sepsis' or 'became infected' would occur. I've never heard of a bee sting becoming infected. .
I remember years ago (probably 1996) when, after getting stung by (probably a wasp) on the wrist one afternoon. The following day I was working a RHIB in Swansea Bay and when I removed the drysuit that afternoon my hand ended up like the old Kenny Everett comedy hands.
Popped in to see the old Doc (old Dr Powell would have been 97 now if he'd lived - missed the funeral as I was flying out to Lesotho that day) and sent back home pumped full of antihistamines and antibiotics come think of it
 

Apple 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
498
Location
South of Watford
Number of Hives
140
Heard of a few incidences lately where infection rather than a systemic reaction was the problem

I remember years ago (probably 1996) when, after getting stung by (probably a wasp) on the wrist one afternoon. The following day I was working a RHIB in Swansea Bay and when I removed the drysuit that afternoon my hand ended up like the old Kenny Everett comedy hands.
Popped in to see the old Doc (old Dr Powell would have been 97 now if he'd lived - missed the funeral as I was flying out to Lesotho that day) and sent back home pumped full of antihistamines and antibiotics come think of it
Kenny's character Cupid Something or other always made my Gran laugh... so much she spat out her false teeth once!
 

beeno 

Queen Bee
Joined
Apr 25, 2011
Messages
5,010
Reaction score
167
Location
South East
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
5
It is so important to make sure that the veil is kept clear of a beekeeper's face. In my experience there have been occasions when bees have been feisty, even though they have been placid on other occasions.
Perhaps this discussion thread should include comments about experiences and/or recommendations about different styles of beekeeping veils.
The bee-suit which I bought has a round hat with gauze/net which extends downwards from the rim of the hat, and connects with a wire loop of the same diameter at shoulder level. When I first started to use this suit, I found that it was possible for the veil to touch the skin of my face in some situations - and the bees discovered this too!
There were also a couple of occasions when bees managed to get inside the veil as well. On one occasion I actually had two bees walking on the inside of my veil, but thankfully I was not stung, and was able to get away from the hives to be able to get the bees safely removed.
The reason why I am telling this story is that after these experiences I did some thinking about how to prevent these kinds of problems.
I made an additional wire hoop from thin spring-steel wire, and stitched it to the inside of the veil, about half-way between the hat-rim level and shoulder-level (around about the level of the tip of my nose). This has been entirely successful in keeping the veil well away from the skin of my face - in fact it is now difficult to even deliberately press the veil against my face.
The other problem, of bees being able to find a way to get inside of the veil, has also been solved (at least it has up till now!). There is a flap which covers the spot where the zips meet up (near the throat, under the chin). This flap is held down by velcro fastening strips, but I found that these strips were only on the sides of the flap on my bee suit. There was no similar velcro along the bottom of the flap, and it was possible for bees to crawl through this small space. I have sewn in additional velcro to completely close the bottom of the flap against the suit, and have not had any further problem.
On a recent occasion, when I had hundreds of bees flying around my head, it was rather comforting to have the confidence that bees could not get to my face.
Could you post a pic of your additional wire insert pls as my husband suggested something similar?
 

understanding_bees 

House Bee
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
127
Reaction score
98
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
2
Could you post a pic of your additional wire insert pls as my husband suggested something similar?
I am attaching two photos, but with a dummy mannequin.
One of the photos is of my bee suit veil. The other photo is of my own design, which consists of a cape which sits over my shoulders, with a veil and hat. This veil is very convenient because it can be fitted over my head (or removed from my head) in about two seconds, and provides general protection for me while I am working in the garden in the vicinity of the beehives.
 

Attachments

Antipodes 

Field Bee
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Messages
888
Reaction score
264
Location
Tasmania
Hive Type
langstroth
This is the suit I have. The best feature is the way the veil is off the face. Scroll down to see the second photo- showing side on view.

 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
19,864
Reaction score
1,750
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
7
This is the suit I have. The best feature is the way the veil is off the face. Scroll down to see the second photo- showing side on view.

Yes mine is similar. Never get the veil against my face. Yes the fabric part of the veil is snug against my head but quite frankly if I am getting stung there either I am doing something wrong or the colony needs a new queen
 

Frizzaldo 

New Bee
Joined
May 23, 2018
Messages
27
Reaction score
5
Location
n/a
Hive Type
none
the oz armour suits use more rigid veil material than in you pictures ( i use a similar light veil when mowing near the hives). if you have any sort of bad reaction to stings buying a decent suit should be your first priority. they are expensive but may save you medical expenses down the line.
 

Paulo20 

New Bee
Joined
Jan 24, 2019
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
5
Following my systemic reaction to a wasp sting, being told not to pick up any more bee stings, and issued with an Epipen I was stung through the veil on my chin as I pulled one frame in the middle of the brood nest, looking for brood in preparation for OA dribbling. They weren't well pleased. In addition I had hell of a job getting the frame back and did want to finish the job so couldn't stop to get the stinger out, so got the full dose. Started to swell on one side of my face, thick lip, red check and one of my eyes started to close. An hour later after taking one piriton tablet, 10mg of steroids, antihistamine cream and cold compresses on my my face and eye I was miraculously as good as new. I assume the steroids played a large part in this and wondered if all beekeepers should have them at hand together with the antihistamines.
 

Swarm 

Queen Bee
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
7,946
Reaction score
683
Location
South Wales
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
more than 20, less than 100.
Just the finger, Brendan? Reason I ask is that swollen finger looks like pretty normal, localised reaction. I've had similar, unable to even bend the finger, sometimes travels turning your hand into a bit of a boxing glove. Then there's the sting that brings no reaction apart from the initial sharp pain, they all seem to do that.
 

Brendan14 

New Bee
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
25
Reaction score
1
Location
Sussex
Hive Type
none
Just the finger, Brendan? Reason I ask is that swollen finger looks like pretty normal, localised reaction. I've had similar, unable to even bend the finger, sometimes travels turning your hand into a bit of a boxing glove. Then there's the sting that brings no reaction apart from the initial sharp pain, they all seem to do that.
This was about 6 hours after the sting, it was burning up and the pain was traveling up through my hand into my wrist, it kept me awake at night. In the end all my knuckles were swollen and then I gave in and called the doctor.
About three years ago I got stung just below my eye and again the next day the swelling totally closed my eye up, I looked like I had just left a boxing ring and it lasted for three days and would only go after getting some antibiotics from the doctor.
 

Swarm 

Queen Bee
Joined
May 29, 2011
Messages
7,946
Reaction score
683
Location
South Wales
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
more than 20, less than 100.
That's why I said it looked normal, I once got hammered on my hand and wrist. Fingers like yours, swelling traveled up past my elbow, I looked like Popeye.
 

Apple 

Drone Bee
Joined
Jan 15, 2014
Messages
1,180
Reaction score
498
Location
South of Watford
Number of Hives
140
That's why I said it looked normal, I once got hammered on my hand and wrist. Fingers like yours, swelling traveled up past my elbow, I looked like Popeye.
Perhaps you should have dipped it in olive oil?
If I get a sting in the face I end up even more looking like Quasimodo!
 
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
11,597
Reaction score
1,493
Location
Fareham, Hampshire UK
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
6
Perhaps you should have dipped it in olive oil?
If I get a sting in the face I end up even more looking like Quasimodo!
Yeh ... we've all been there .... I took two stings just above my eye a couple of years ago ... my eye closed up, one side of my face swelled to a point where my skin felt tight ... loads of laughs at work because everyone knew what had happened. Took a good couple of days to go down. Stings elsewhere I don't react much to these days ... trick is to get the stinger off quickly, couple of antihistamines and some AH ointment on asap. A lot of people who feel that they have reacted badly are just not accustomed to what can be a normal beekeeping experience ! If symptoms become evident away from the general area of the sting or if breathing difficulties become evident or any feelings of fainting then it is time to get immediate help. Anaphylaxis is serious ... bee stings are unpleasant - be aware of the difference.
 

Antipodes 

Field Bee
Joined
Mar 24, 2019
Messages
888
Reaction score
264
Location
Tasmania
Hive Type
langstroth
Just the finger, Brendan? Reason I ask is that swollen finger looks like pretty normal, localised reaction. I've had similar, unable to even bend the finger, sometimes travels turning your hand into a bit of a boxing glove. Then there's the sting that brings no reaction apart from the initial sharp pain, they all seem to do that.
Childhood memories of blowing up washing up glove.... :giggle:
 

Latest posts

Top