What to do with my naughty colony.

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On a positive note. They survived the winter 🍯
 
A virgin queen mates on average with, say, 14 drones; some are gentle and others are a tad defensive, which in and of itself may not be a bad trait. As the queen uses the saved sperm, she could use up all the "bad" sperms from the aggressive drone (s). Thus, in time, the next brood may not be as defensive as the previous generation. So I would give the colony some time.
In my area AHB strains are not uncommon as European queens are known to prefer to mate with AHB drones. Heightened defensiveness can also translate resistance to mites and SHB in my experience. Just a thought.
 
A virgin queen mates on average with, say, 14 drones; some are gentle and others are a tad defensive, which in and of itself may not be a bad trait. As the queen uses the saved sperm, she could use up all the "bad" sperms from the aggressive drone (s). Thus, in time, the next brood may not be as defensive as the previous generation. So I would give the colony some time.
In my area AHB strains are not uncommon as European queens are known to prefer to mate with AHB drones. Heightened defensiveness can also translate resistance to mites and SHB in my experience. Just a thought.
Wouldn't a lot have to come right for this to really happen. The unpleasant nature not been a result of queen influences and happening to use up the aggressive sperm first for starters?

Isn't it much more likely that a change in nature, is as change does happen, is due to an environmental or seasonal change?
 
Isn't it much more likely that a change in nature, is as change does happen, is due to an environmental or seasonal change?
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Yes, a recent skunk attack, for instance, could cause such sudden behavioral outcome, having little to do with the issue of sperm bank.
 
You could also exchange the positions of the problem hive and a friendlier one so the problem hive has lost most of its field bees to the original site before inspecting. Then use whatever management plan you decide on. At least the inspection should be more pleasant.
Surely the friendly hive that has been exchanged also looses it's friendly bees!
 
Surely the friendly hive that has been exchanged also looses it's friendly bees!
Yes, but there aren't as many aggressive bees in either colony, so inspecting them not as big an issue - each only loses bees to the other colony (foraging bees are usually admitted without a problem)
 
In Oklahoma where I am, I can sometimes trap feral bees to strengthen my weak hive with the captured field force. That ought to be an art.
Really the next time out don’t the vast majority return to their original colony ?
 
Really the next time out don’t the vast majority return to their original colony ?
Check the thread on Moving Hives on this forum: if you either move them three miles OR seal them up for three consecutive days, they will forget their GPS on their original colony. Similarly, when being robbed, do the same. The robbers will stay with the victim colony after three days and join them. Bees, smart as they are, seem to lose their orientation after three days. Next time, please try and let me hear your result, ok?

I need to point out that my bees are on a screened bottom board during the heat of summer and chill of the winter, which I block in the spring to help raise brood till late May.
 
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Check the thread on Moving Hives on this forum: if you either move them three miles OR seal them up for three consecutive days, they will forget their GPS on their original colony. Similarly, when being robbed, do the same. The robbers will stay with the victim colony after three days and join them. Bees, smart as they are, seem to lose their orientation after three days. Next time, please try and let me hear your result, ok?
No need to wait I have a largish apiary that’s used for queen rearing, I often make up Nucs or break up a cell raiser and distribute within the same site confining for a few days. Not all forget after a few days but the vast majority stay put. This winter I moved 6 hives in the school garden 20m it was the coldest 2 week period here. Bees confined for the entire time a few returned and next flying day there were a number buzzing the old spot. To be honest I think trapping feral bees a bit OTT I have visions of you jumping around Oklahoma with a butterfly net😂 why not just transfer a frame of emerging brood.
 
No need to wait I have a largish apiary that’s used for queen rearing, I often make up Nucs or break up a cell raiser and distribute within the same site confining for a few days. Not all forget after a few days but the vast majority stay put. This winter I moved 6 hives in the school garden 20m it was the coldest 2 week period here. Bees confined for the entire time a few returned and next flying day there were a number buzzing the old spot. To be honest I think trapping feral bees a bit OTT I have visions of you jumping around Oklahoma with a butterfly net😂 why not just transfer a frame of emerging brood.
You, sir, are an excellent beekeeper!
 
Which part is why? The summer heat can be terrible here; also, according to Australian study, SSB (Screened Bottom Board) yield more honey, I believe it was 30% more if my memory serves me right). In winter, I do not want my bees to be too active when there is nothing to be had outside, so they must be cool to consume least amount of their store.
 
I need to point out that my bees are on a screened bottom board during the heat of summer and chill of the winter, which I block in the spring to help raise brood till late May.


Which part is why?
Why did you need to point that out in realtion to this conversation? I can't follow your theme. Lots of facts - some interesting. But is it providing just "data", randon information or relevant knowledge. It may be the latter - but I just can't follow you.
 
Why did you need to point that out in realtion to this conversation? I can't follow your theme. Lots of facts - some interesting. But is it providing just "data", randon information or relevant knowledge. It may be the latter - but I just can't follow you.
All right, the point was about sealing up the hive which you might think suffocate the bees in the heat. Hence my explanation that they won;t, for they are on screened bottom. Sorry for the confusion.
 

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