What paint/sealer do you use for cosies?

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
434
Reaction score
115
Location
Rhondda S. Wales
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
4 national
Was looking to get some Thompson Roofseal for the Kingspan cosies I have made, as recommended on here.. But looking at the specs for the stuff it sais that the 2.5ltr containers are "Low odour" but the 4 ltr are "High odour" A bit confusing as they are being sold as the same product..
What have you used to paint them with... ( I have to be careful with "fumes" because of my health problems)
 
That's interesting as I looked the 4L can up on the B&Q site and it doesn't give an odour rating but does say "low VOC"
 
Was looking to get some Thompson Roofseal for the Kingspan cosies I have made, as recommended on here.. But looking at the specs for the stuff it sais that the 2.5ltr containers are "Low odour" but the 4 ltr are "High odour" A bit confusing as they are being sold as the same product..
What have you used to paint them with... ( I have to be careful with "fumes" because of my health problems)
Good luck getting paint to stick to the foil facing.
 
Was looking to get some Thompson Roofseal for the Kingspan cosies I have made, as recommended on here.. But looking at the specs for the stuff it sais that the 2.5ltr containers are "Low odour" but the 4 ltr are "High odour" A bit confusing as they are being sold as the same product..
What have you used to paint them with... ( I have to be careful with "fumes" because of my health problems)

I've used it and seen it recommended here. It's water-based and comes off paint brushes easily as long as you don't leave it. It needs thin coats at first and mustn't be allowed to pool. It's got a smell but not an offensive or irritant hydrocarbon stink...it's similar to emulsion paint. Ideally it's three coats direct to PIR but you will get away with two. If it gets damaged you just paint over with no preparation. It helps seal down any taped edges. I use a small, fluffy roller.
 
Last edited:
My cosies are covered in aluminium tape…. Boring job. Then painted with masonry paint.
I feel the foil covering needs more protection than paint alone can offer.
They are pretty fragile if you drop them. They dent
Mine are 8 years old, still functional but looking pretty battered.
 
Good luck getting paint to stick to the foil facing.
Garden shades or those water based look alikes stick perfectly well to the foil surface and to the aliminium tape I used to cover the cut edges and joints. 10 + years in and my original cosie (converted to a solar melter) that has always stood outside still has all the paint attached... it's falling apart now but the paint is still stuck on. Took about three coats to get a good coverage ...

Here's what it looked like when I made it ... I'll post photos of it now tomorrow ..

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125609724@N03/albums/72157648733313429
 
Personally, I'd avoid a masonry paint. This type of paint, almost always water based, performs by soaking into the substrate. I've always used Pro Cote in a spray can. Yes, it's a bit more costly but it's also very quick and clean and has lasted well on my cosies.
https://www.toolstation.com/industrial-spray-paint-500ml/p36577
 
I cant add the link to the post... it was posted byfiat500bee on sept 7 2020
Can someone please post the link about the Kingspan cosies that are mentioned above?

I'm sure that's generally correct, but we're very lucky here in the shadow of The Cairngorms where we usually get protection from the worst of the wet and live in an area known, perhaps surprisingly, for having a relatively mild climate and good numbers of sunny days, even in winter :)

I now realise that the forum has been "here" many time before, most notable on this thread; FAO DerekM. @derekm deserves thanks and praise for the research and dissemination of information he has done. It seems that five years ago at least, he had far more supporters than detractors.

I'm plodding on with preparations and I'm almost there with these simple, insulated covers which many others have made in the same way previously, but I took a few photos of the construction which mught be helpful for anyone else contemplating this job.

First the raw materials: I chose Kingspan TW50 450 x 1200mm (50mm thick PIR wallboards intended to be fitted in a blockwork cavity as it is constructed:

View attachment 22018

PU (polyurethane sealant)...far superior to silicone and acts as a strong adhesive as well as a sealant, aluminium foil tape (very sticky and thin, easily moulded in awkward places and Thompson's Roofseal (a thick, water-based, low odour paint designed for flat roof repairs....sticks to just about any surface and sets to a flexible, waterproof skin...no primers needed and easily overcoatable even after many years without any preparation.

The size of the sheets is relevant because the 450 dimension is exactly right to cover the height of two deep boxes which was right for my needs. But you could trim to any size you want or add empty boxes or ekes to accomodate this cover if you were overwintering on one box or a smaller combination. I am using Abelo boxes which are very precisely made; I secured a couple using masking tape and they acted as my jig for assembly.

View attachment 22020

I decided the simplest thing was to lap each side piece to the next so they are all the same cutting dimension. hence I needed 460mm plus a thickness of insulation (50mm) and I added another 5mm to accomodate minor errors and still have a tight fit......so 515mm. I don't have a bench saw but used my power saw to get the neatest cut; you could use a hand saw quite easily. The accuracy of cut isn't too important if you measure the cut line for the two pieces you get from each sheet from opposite ends; you can use the factory cut edge where you bond the pieces together.

View attachment 22022

View attachment 22021

To join the pieces I didn't need skewers, nails or anything other than a generous helping of sealant. I assembled on a very flat floor and pushed tight against my "jig".

View attachment 22023

Within a few hours it was all set fairly solid and I taped the edges. Then it was out to the garage for the first of possibly three coats of the Roofseal. It was applied by roller for speed and can be worked into loose parts of the foil to seal everything.

View attachment 22024

It is not designed to be seen and therefore looks a bit sh*te, but looks aren't everything ( as I know all too well ;) ). The subdued appearance will help the hive blend into the drab winter landscape rather than being a shiny beacon to attract unwanted attention. Here it is after the first coat.

View attachment 22025


I intend to leave the inside upainted but reading back through the old thread I realised that I ought to seal the inner joints, which I did using the same PU sealant.

View attachment 22028

All that's left to do is the additional coats of paint and then to think about the roof treatment; if I don't add something more up there, even with a polyhive roof I run the risk of the roof being the coldest part of the hive. Once it's installed I'll show the result. :)
 
I've been doing some modifications to existing and making some extra PIR cosies. Mine are not much more than an extra deep roof that will just about cover the sides of a single National deep. I wanted to give them a bit more insulation at the top without reducing the inside depth. So I added the insulation above the roof, taped it all up and then got out the tin of Roofseal. It goes on with a little, fluffy roller that can be easily cleaned under the tap. The first coat is really thin and just gives a receptive surface for the next coat...three coats is best. The tin says it all; it's flexible and just moves with any dents or marks made in the foil surface when in use. A roof painted three years ago is shown. No preparation is needed to add a new coat and that will bond to the previous coats and encase any light debris such as dust or lichen.


20221106_104850.jpg


20221106_103408 - Copy.jpg
20221106_103112.jpg
 
Back
Top