Warning Signs?

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Murox 

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For screening it might be worth considering some of the tall ornamental grasses, some can grow up to 2 or more metres tall and many will establish completely in two years. Have a look at the RHS website for varieties.
 
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thorn 

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It varies.
I think, legally recognising there is a danger and using the word "Warning" means you are accepting responsibility for their actions, while using the word "Caution" is merely advising them of a potential risk.
legally, that's nonsense.
 

B+. 

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legally, that's nonsense.
Thank you for clarifying that. I'd been told that it was better to phrase it as "advice" than as a warning. Is there a better way to do it?
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Thank you for clarifying that. I'd been told that it was better to phrase it as "advice" than as a warning. Is there a better way to do it?
I like the approack that the late great Hugh Falkus had when discouraging people from fishing his bat on the Tweed, simple sign with but two words - the second being OFF!
 

ericbeaumont 

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russian vine" will do the trick
Please don't: it's a non-native monumental nuisance that may be useful to pollinators but looks bleak when the leaves drop and will give you work to get rid when established. The runners root as they lie, so it spreads easily and can travel 40ft a year.

Google evergreen honeysuckle instead.

Bowsaw? Hard work: get a Silky Gomtaro, save energy and work faster.
 
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Erichalfbee 

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Please don't: it's a non-native monumental nuisance that's no use to pollinators,
I think you're wrong there. The Russian vine over somebody's garage in the village is teeming with bees of all sorts
 

ericbeaumont 

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I think you're wrong there.
I am.

Mind you, in all the years I've looked at it I've not seen anything on it (perhaps there were better options for bees at the time) but I don't reckon the nectar benefit outweighs the drawbacks.

Came across a Russian vine thread from 2014, when the village garage was first mentioned. :)
 

Moobee 

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If you want to cover it rapidly a "russian vine" will do the trick, but can be a bit *too* vigorous if it can climb onto anything else
Very invasive pest. Not known as the ‘mile a minute’ plant for nothing. Better off with clematis montana which at least looks nice. Or ivy…..
 

Sutty 

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Maybe a fast growing annual to cover it rapidly for the time being, as well as something like clematis for the longer term.
 

beekeepershens 

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injury to a trespasser .......unfortunately it is not a defence to say they should not have been there.. so people climbing over a wall and injuring themselves have been known to sue the owner of the wall for their injury,....its knowing the risk and taking sensible precautions to protect the likely trespassers.... could children be tempted into the field? If therefore children go in will they be tempted to investigate the hives? if yes to both then to protect them and you I would think it sensible to screen/ fence them off ... ditto adults...
 

silentscyther 

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Hi All,

I keep my bees in a private field, no right of way through field and access via a padlocked gate. The hives are in a fenced off area (stock proof fencing) within the field, and you need to go through another gate to get to them.

I don’t have any warning signs, as the other people entitled to access the field know about my bees.

Anyone got any views / advice around whether I should have signs to warn trespassers?

Thanks
Public liability insurance doesn’t cost much. Our local Bee Keepers Association gives it a part of membership. Just as a back up Might be an idea.
 

Murox 

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electrified-fence_1024x1024.png
this has proved to be the most useful deterrent, just be sure that the energiser has a battery back up and that its got enough zap to penetrate thick fur/hair.
 

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