Quantcast

Unwired foundation

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

tkwinston4 

Field Bee
Joined
Mar 9, 2009
Messages
540
Reaction score
0
Location
WBC/Smith/National/nucs in Horsham, West Sussex.
Hive Type
smith
Number of Hives
7
Hi all, hope you are all doing ok?
Couple of questions from a new bee. I fancy trying cut comb, can i just put a couple of frames of unwired in?
Just been looking at prices on Thornes, can someone tell me what the difference is between these "Sheets Unwired" and "Thin Super for Cut Comb"? Cant i just use unwired foundation for cut comb?
BTW this will be my first full year. I resisted the urge to open up my one hive. I also plan on splitting the hive this year. I wont be taking all the honey my girls make, i will just take enough for me and family and they can have rest. That is why i thought maybe cut comb would be easier. Just take a couple of unwired frames out and replace with drawn wired comb for the rest of the season. Then next year do the same and that way i can rotate and replace the comb on a regular basis. Is that just me hoping it will be that easy? :svengo:
I am doing this for the survival of the honey bee not for the honey i will get. Not supposed to have honey anyway :(
 

Poly Hive 

Queen Bee
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
13,655
Reaction score
3
Location
Scottish Borders
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
9 and 18 Nucs
Yes you can put a couple of frames in, just not next to each other. (too wide a bee space)

The extra thin cc foundation is precisely that, so it makes for the thin mid rib in the eating experience.

PH
 
T

Tom Bick 

Guest
This may interest you tkwinston4 I like the cut comb honey and have always had a few frames in the supers with un wired foundation but remember to write on the top of the frames no wire as it is can be difficult to see the unwired frames later on.

This year I am going to put in the frames as usual but instead of a full sheet of unwired foundation I will have only a starter strip of wax and will let the bees do the rest. The reason for this is foundation is recycled and is starting to show levels of chemicals in it although probably not that high yet but in time who knows.

I think it is possible to get foundation made from wax cappings and is considered reasonably chemical free.
 

Annrbel 

New Bee
Joined
Feb 22, 2010
Messages
35
Reaction score
0
Location
On a hill overlookig the East Sussex downland UK
Hive Type
wbc
Number of Hives
3
We tried a couple of bare frames last year, the result was wavy comb and different thickness, but we didn't mind. Doing pretty much the same as you with regard to leaving the honey, although as we did treat the bees with oxalic acid in winter we have marked the frames that were in at the time - don't fancy getting them mixed up. This year we are going to try a couple more things, first just a bit of starter wax in with the hope the wax is more even - and hopefully reduce the brace comb building. Secondly after learning that bees may mix different pollens from various stores for their own purposes, we will be ensuring that we leave them a mix of frames so they have spring, summer and winter honey stores.

Just one more thing, I think we are a couple of years ahead of you, we expected that by leaving a full super of honey (and sharing a full super for a couple of nucs which were then given away - and are both doing well so don't shoot me down in flames I know you're not supposed to), we thought we wouldn't have much honey for ourselves, well I've still got a larder full and we give it away to friends (yes I know, need more friends then.) Be interested if you have the same result. Anyway really pleased to find others doing the same as us, think that a mix benefits all.

Rose with the light this morning to sow Echium and weed the bee garden, managed an hour before they woke up and went for my husband - burrowed in his hair but didn't sting - that is a first!
 

Mike a 

Drone Bee
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
1,789
Reaction score
0
Location
Hampshire
Hive Type
langstroth
Number of Hives
Between 17-20
I get a lump in my throat just thinking about eating recycled wax.

All these places that offer to take all the old, disguising, disease ridden, mouldy, chemical laced wax and convert it into clean fresh wax... Sorry I don't care how good their filters are theres no way I would eat it.

:rant:

I would recommend you just put in a small starter strip of foundation and let the bees build their own natural wax comb. Its not perfect with all the pesticides around but it must be a little healthier.
 

Latest posts

Top