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Ply as a hive material

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Finman 

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Here is a Finnish UPM ply handbook, 68 pages.
http://www.forestindustries.fi/Infokortit/handbookplywood/Documents/HandbookOfFinnishPlywood.pdf


Spruce/pine ply is better than birch ply to hives.

Water content of ply may rise up to 30%. Above 20% ply start to rotten.

Heat conductivity is worse in conifer ply and their are lighter than birch.

The weight of 18 mm conifer ply is 11kg/m2 + moisture

The weight of pine is 450 kg/m3 and conifer ply is 520 kg/m2

Moisture may add the weight 40% (= water content 30%)

So in moist condition the weight may be 600-700 kg/m3.

.
 

beebreeder 

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Very interesting, thanks Finman.
I have 20 plus hives all made from 18 mm wbp from builders merchant, treat edges well and glue and screw preferably with stailess screws, only downside is weight against cedar
 
T

Tom Bick 

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Also the cheaper WBP plywoods from the Far East have high levels of urea formaldehyde glue in them and when hot off gasses formaldehyde gas (although small amounts but)
 

oliver90owner 

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and ability to breath

Not quite so important with OMFs. I still like proper wood (just the Dartingtons which are ply in this tiny part of the globe, and it would be silly to make them in cedar) - doesn't blunt the cutting tools as quickly, doesn't need the same protection either, so over the lifetime of the box, cedar probably wins hands down on all counts - as long as it remains a sustainable crop.

Regards, RAB
 

Finman 

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What I have noticed, the ply does not stand long the propane flame when I clean bottom boards. The structure of ply will be destroyed.
 
T

Tom Bick 

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I can not think of things that are more sustainable

The tree cut down to produce the timber 4 trees can be planted in the Shadow of that tree in time three of the trees thinned out to allow one to mature to a large tree

The timber produced from the tree will last providing it is looked after longer than it will take for a tree to grow and replace the original tree cut down

You can plant a sapling in the middle of a your lawn and it will probably grow quite happily requiring no complex eco systems for growth such as tropical hardwoods

Cedar has being recognised as a valuble crop for many years and as a result planted for the timber it is getting more expensive especially as it seems almost every new building apparently is having a certain amount of cedar cladding

Nothing against ply have cut up 1000's of sheets in my time at work and it is better than plastic
 

Hivemaker. 

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Yes cedar is most likely more sustainable than ply,especially hardwood faced plys,and is far more eco friendly regards not using millions of gallons of harmful chemicals in the bonding process. Most established cedar plantations are managed by natural regeneration,so no replanting is needed,and it grows fast. But we all use ply as well,its a very convenient material.
 
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Finman 

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About sustainable? its is not suitable at all in beekeeping.

beekeeping stuff must be handy that nursin is possible. When I nurse bees,
it has nothing to do with globe nursing.

Blastic is the most suitable to my back bone.
Nothing wrong in it.

At least ply is quite expencive even here.
 

MJBee 

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Hi Hivemaker,
What sort of climate does Western Red Cedar require? I have the space and would like to grow my own hives:) I have a 60ft Cedar Attica that is doing well but it may be too hot here.
Regards Mike
 

Hivemaker. 

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Cut that one down and make hives.

It typically occurs at low to mid elevations along the coast and in the wet belt of the Interior of North Western of North America, along Oregon, Washington and British Columbia , where the climate is cool, mild, and moist.

Western red cedar grows best in moist to wet soils, with lots of nutrients. It is tolerant of shade and long-lived, sometimes over 1,000 years. or more below....

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thuja_plicata
 

MJBee 

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Thanks for that Hivemaker, as I suspected TOO HOT pity. SWMBO would not entertain the demolition of Cedar Attica. I would cos the little finger sized catkins cover the pool with a yellow scum of pollen which the bees ignore,
and the needles block the filter no matter which way the wind is blowing:(
:cheers2: Mike.
 

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