Cutting fondant

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Joined
Apr 29, 2023
Messages
205
Reaction score
110
Location
Northumberland
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
100
Despite being relatively youthful for a beekeeper at the grand old age of 36, I've got significant damage to my back from my previous job, particularly bad when involving any kind of torsion (another reason I prefer frames the warm way). Sawing or splicing fondant with a bread knife has had me in agony, and I'm likely to be using it conservatively instead of whacking 6.25kg straight on, having bisected it with a spade. So, my question is; do the heated uncapping knives I don't have any of, slide through fondant easily or perhaps one of those electric knives people have sometimes used to cut joints of meat serve the purpose? Can't be getting me poor little 73yr old dad to cut up fondant for 100 colonies. Thanks everyone.
 
Or use Fondabee fondant packs of ~1kg each. Just cut a flap on the bottom of the pack and pop them on. Yes - they are more expensive but a lot less sticky to use, and the plastic bag they come in prevents drying out. For somebody with your complaint probably well worth the extra.
 
We've saved a starving hive -- and the queen has reverted to laying again, thank goodness -- recently using Candipolline and all hives on which we've tried it seem to love it. They don't want syrup, will take fondant but definitely prefer candipolline. Hasn't been a great year for seeing pollen-covered legs.
 
2.5 kg bags of Fondabee split very easily if required. Use a Stanly Knife to cut throught the polythene bag and fondant below and split by hand. Easy !
 
Candipolline gold apparently has milk & egg proteins and pollen added.
Neither Milk or Egg Proteins are good for bees, when will people learn !!!

How the hell manufacturers get away with selling this crap for feeding bees I'll never understand. They clearly have zero understanding of the nutritional needs of honey bees.

Excuse the rant but i just can't help when I see stuff like this.
 
Using eggs and powdered milk in pollen sub is common in the States
Yep, I know, pretty common everywhere but that doesn't make it right. Unfortunately average joe beekeeper has little to no nutritional insight and therefore sees the word "protein" and thinks ah that'ts ok then.
Sorry but it isn't. You might thinks it's doing good, but the reverse can be true, even subclinical effects can subsatatially affect performance.

One of the drivers for it's inclusion is that it's relatively cheap and it doesn't require ongoing very expensive processing.
 
Despite being relatively youthful for a beekeeper at the grand old age of 36, I've got significant damage to my back from my previous job, particularly bad when involving any kind of torsion (another reason I prefer frames the warm way). Sawing or splicing fondant with a bread knife has had me in agony, and I'm likely to be using it conservatively instead of whacking 6.25kg straight on, having bisected it with a spade. So, my question is; do the heated uncapping knives I don't have any of, slide through fondant easily or perhaps one of those electric knives people have sometimes used to cut joints of meat serve the purpose? Can't be getting me poor little 73yr old dad to cut up fondant for 100 colonies. Thanks everyone.
This is how I cut up my fondant and place several slices over the QX under a 50mm eke.


View attachment trim.72D01D25-C5C3-4BC8-B7CC-F11B87A38076.MOV
 

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