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taff.. 

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you know what they say about the best laid plans......


nature is bound to throw them out of the window :banghead:


at last weeks inspection, the nectar had seemingly dried up and the bees were a bit defensive, which is a first for one of the colonies so I planned to take all the supers off to extract next monday, and put on Apiguard (if needed after having the monitod boards in over the weekend).
But.....

Talking to MrsTaff on the phone last night, she was walking the dogs through the field next to the orchard and she said it was like walking through a carpet of bees, red clover has just popped out and they are going mad on it :banghead:

I know I should be happy to be having another flow, but I'm now a little concerned about putting off mite treatment for another 2 weeks, what's the latest you'd dare leave it?
 

oliver90owner 

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Be patient. You are jumping the gun. Results of monitoring first. What were they like last time you checked for mite-fall?

Regards, RAB
 

taff.. 

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jumping the gun RAB?

I think I covered it in the OP


and put on Apiguard (if needed after having the monitod boards in over the weekend).

the actual question and point of the post was in the last sentence


I know I should be happy to be having another flow, but I'm now a little concerned about putting off mite treatment for another 2 weeks, what's the latest you'd dare leave it?
or, put another way, when will you remove your supers and start your treatments?
 

oliver90owner 

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but I'm now a little concerned about putting off mite treatment for another 2 weeks

Exactly my point about jumping the gun. IF they don't need it you are not going to be doing it are you? Then you won't be putting it off for 2 weeks will you?

Find out your results before worrying here, is all I say. Raising hypothetical threads about things which may never happen is a great way to operate! Simple, diagnose and then plan an appropriate course of action.

Personally, I doubt I shall remove supers until nearer the end of the month. I might dare to leave treatment for varroa until January, but probably will not.

Either way, I will not be worring about 'daring' anything. If they were to need treatment, they would get it when required - not a case of any particular timing. If they don't, they won't.

RAB
 

oliver90owner 

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What is the weather forecast for the next two months? What about night-time temperatures? If brooding, what is the temperature in the broodnest? How big are these colonies? How much is the knock-down reduced if......All unknowns, I daresay.

If it doesn't work and needs something else, one uses something else, or risk the bees health. Not too much of a problem and by the sounds of it the increased harvest would amply pay for another treatment.

Still all ifs and buts. Find out first, take appropriate action afterwards. There are alternatives out there. Two weeks may be ten days, or a week. Will it make a difference? No! Just find out first.

RAB
 

Mike a 

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I would keep the super on until the end of August, if they fill it then you can decide to take it or leave on for winter and treat any time you like but remember not to extract any honey from those frames as it will contain trace amounts of the treatment in the honey and wax combs.

During the next few inspections monitor the amount of stores in the brood frames, ideally as per the books they should have them at least half full and capped before they cluster. If you remove the super now and treat at least any extra nectar they bring in over the next few weeks will be put into the brood chamber.

There is no one perfect answer here as there is too many variables the weather being the most unpredictable of them all.

If we have a repeat of last year then you could leave the super/s on until mid September extract it and give it back to them for a few days before you start your treatment and feed.

On the other hand if the weather for example turns for the worse on September 1st through to December then a lot of colonies will be too light on honey stores and fondant will be your best friend.

Either way don't panic there is always a way of ensuring your colony shouldn't starve. Last year I picked up a nice tip - Take a drawn comb and fill it with fondant mixed with a small amount of their own honey on both sides using a spatula and swap the frame in quickly on a mild day. Slide the crown board off just enough to remove a frame to put the fondant frame in. (you should already know which frame is light on stores from earlier inspections)
 

peteinwilts 

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last year I did my first dose on the 15th September, although it stayed warm well into October.
 

MuswellMetro 

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Be patient. You are jumping the gun. Results of monitoring first. What were they like last time you checked for mite-fall?

Regards, RAB
15th September last year, this year, depends on what happens/weather ,queen ,flow, number of eggs in the brood
 

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