Running out of equipment as bees are not capping supers

Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum

Help Support Beekeeping & Apiculture Forum:

Moobee 

House Bee
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2020
Messages
197
Reaction score
122
Location
Bracklesham Bay
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
2
We are experiencing the same
Me too. Ive just removed the varroa floor which I had in as was monitoring - hopefully this helps airflow a bit. My full super is on top so wondered if I moved it too soon but was worried that might get honey bound as they have shown no signs of wanting to swarm..... yet......
Has anyone tried checker boarding to see if it encourages them to cap the filled frames?
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
26,267
Reaction score
628
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
Has anyone tried checker boarding to see if it encourages them to cap the filled frames?
Bees cap cells, when they are full of honey.

You may encourage capping when you carry hives to better pastures.

A hive can cap 140 kg honey in 3 weeks as I have seen.
 

Markthebuilder 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
103
Reaction score
58
Location
Newcastle
Hive Type
none
I’m guessing bees will continue to store nectar syrup for as long as there is a flow and flying / foraging bees to bring it in. This In turn will encourage comb building to create space for eggs/ more nectar.

If there aren’t enough workers of the correct age to process the nectar into honey then I’m assuming what the bees delay capping until they have the time/ resources to get the job done or maybe that’s what they do when it’s to wet, cold or windy to go out. Again ...and this is a guess .... as fare as the bees are concerned they have another 4 months to get the capping done. If you run out of equipment ie they get short of space then flyers will suck up as much of what’s been collected as they can then go find somewhere else to build a storage depot. Meanwhile the remaining young bees with less foragers fetching new nectar in will be able to start capping whilst the new queen sorts herself out .

so does anyone know the comb life of nectar before it must be caped ? And is my hypothesis above reasonable. If not as a bee landlord and aspiring bee keeper I’m happy to be educated
 

Erichalfbee 

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
BeeKeeping Supporter
Joined
Jul 23, 2009
Messages
22,906
Reaction score
4,477
Location
Ceredigion
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
13
I’m guessing bees will continue to store nectar syrup for as long as there is a flow and flying / foraging bees to bring it in. This In turn will encourage comb building to create space for eggs/ more nectar.

If there aren’t enough workers of the correct age to process the nectar into honey then I’m assuming what the bees delay capping until they have the time/ resources to get the job done or maybe that’s what they do when it’s to wet, cold or windy to go out. Again ...and this is a guess .... as fare as the bees are concerned they have another 4 months to get the capping done. If you run out of equipment ie they get short of space then flyers will suck up as much of what’s been collected as they can then go find somewhere else to build a storage depot. Meanwhile the remaining young bees with less foragers fetching new nectar in will be able to start capping whilst the new queen sorts herself out .

so does anyone know the comb life of nectar before it must be caped ? And is my hypothesis above reasonable. If not as a bee landlord and aspiring bee keeper I’m happy to be educated
Yes the bees will just fill cells as fast as they can in a flow and you can hear them processing at night.
You’re wrong about the swarm though. A swarm us made up of more young bees than foragers. Most of the older foragers stay at home.
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
26,267
Reaction score
628
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
I’m guessing bees will continue to store nectar syrup for as long as there is a flow

If there aren’t enough workers of the correct age to process the nectar into honey then

? And is my hypothesis above reasonable. If not as a bee landlord and aspiring bee keeper I’m happy to be educated
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
26,267
Reaction score
628
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
Your hypotesis has no sense. If hive is full, it is full. You are quesing, but I know that issue. I have measured with hive on balance, what happens when the hive is full honey and nectar. I have seen swarms which leave the hive without warning.

- bees do not continue working. They slow down working.

- bees process what they process, but lack of room hinders their effective working and nectar drying

Foragers slow down their work. It is middle of Juni now, and the hive cannot work, because Landlord cannot arrange new supers. Neither she can extract the honey.

I wonder what heck theories is rising here, but all are false.
I wonder too, why swarm has not left yet from hive, and then honey crop is there, and jpu do noy need to invent any mrte theories.
 
Last edited:

Markthebuilder 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
103
Reaction score
58
Location
Newcastle
Hive Type
none
Yes the bees will just fill cells as fast as they can in a flow and you can hear them processing at night.
You’re wrong about the swarm though. A swarm us made up of more young bees than foragers. Most of the older foragers stay at home.
Thanks for the info
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
26,267
Reaction score
628
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
Yes the bees will just fill cells as fast as they can in a flow and you can hear them processing at night.
You’re wrong about the swarm though. A swarm us made up of more young bees than foragers. Most of the older foragers stay at home.
Oh no.
Eric, how you explain, that when a hive swarms, it stops forage flying. You see it with eyes.
When the hive in on the balance, no weigh will generate during next couple of weeks. And then they get second swarm and foraging resources are finish.

When the swarm has more young bres, reason is the colony structure and the history of buildup history.
 

Markthebuilder 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
103
Reaction score
58
Location
Newcastle
Hive Type
none
Your hypotesis has no sense. If hive is full, it is full. You are quesing, but I know that issue. I have measured with hive on balance, what happens when the hive is full honey and nectar. I have seen swarms which leave the hive without warning.

- bees do not continue working. They slow down working.

- bees process what they process, but lack of room hinders their effective working and nectar drying

Foragers slow down their work. It is middle of Juni now, and the hive cannot work, because Landlord cannot arrange new supers. Neither she can extract the honey.

I wonder what heck theories is rising here, but all are false.
I wonder too, why swarm has not left yet from hive, and then honey crop is there, and jpu do noy need to invent any mrte theories.
Perhaps hypothesis is the wrong word and I should be asking questions.

is there a time limit on how quickly bees need to turn nectar into honey ? Ie will nectar go off in the comb.
Do bees actually slow down gathering nectar the implication /experience from the original post , is that if they are provided with space they focus on building comb and gathering stores rather than processing it into honey as quickly as beekeepers would like
 

Finman 

Queen Bee
Joined
Nov 8, 2008
Messages
26,267
Reaction score
628
Location
Finland, Helsinki
Hive Type
langstroth
Perhaps hypothesis is the wrong word and I should be asking questions.

is there a time limit on how quickly bees need to turn nectar into honey ? Ie will nectar go off in the comb.
Do bees actually slow down gathering nectar the implication /experience from the original post , is that if they are provided with space they focus on building comb and gathering stores rather than processing it into honey as quickly as beekeepers would like
How long you have nursed bees? You doubt my knowledge and generate your own ideas like no limits

They do not build combs because they do not have room. I have suggested all the time that the hives need more boxes and foundations.

Best case what I have measured with balance is a hive which got 50 kg ready honey in 7 days. 7 x 7 =49.

Once I had a hive on balance , which had a beard on the put wall. It brought 3,5 kg honey per day.

I extracted 3 medium boxes honey, and during next days the hive brought 7 kg honey per day.

And many other stories from my 60 years as a beekeeper.
 

Markthebuilder 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 8, 2015
Messages
103
Reaction score
58
Location
Newcastle
Hive Type
none
How long you have nursed bees? You doubt my knowledge and generate your own ideas like no limits

They do not build combs because they do not have room. I have suggested all the time that the hives need more boxes and foundations.

Best case what I have measured with balance is a hive which got 50 kg ready honey in 7 days. 7 x 7 =49.

Once I had a hive on balance , which had a beard on the put wall. It brought 3,5 kg honey per day.

I extracted 3 medium boxes honey, and during next days the hive brought 7 kg honey per day.

And many other stories from my 60 years as a beekeeper.
Hi Finman I’m not doubting your knowledge at all. And totally accept what you have said .
Im sorry if my post came across wrong
 

Latest posts

Top