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Layensapiary 

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Extractors - yes they are expensive, I was half hoping you were going to say you had a spanish contact/source of reasonably priced ones. :)
Are you aware of Dr. Leo Sharashkin's work with Layens hives ?

I'm down on the Kintyre peninsular, near Campbeltown. We get the full force of SSW -> NNW gales when they happen. Rain only comes horizontal hear :biggrinjester::laughing-smiley-014
Lovely part of Scotland.
Yes I'm aware of Dr Leo, as they seem to call him and of Lazutin. I read the original work of Layens, in French, but it's pre Veroa and could do with updating. I guess the next step is Spanish. There must be books as it is reportedly the most commonly used hive there. Ironically nothing more in French and Dadant is the most commonly used hive here, so no help locally.
I have used a supplier in Spain
Apicola
Colmenas layens the cheapest extractor is just over 200 euros, but for you, the p&pwould probably be ridiculous.
 

Murox 

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It is a great read, and it does indeed contain many useful nuggets.

But in it, Lazutin also asserts that varroa should not be eradicated because they are clearly part of the plan of a "Universal Intelligence"

As to why bees don’t eliminate mites completely, Lazutin speculates that this may be because bees intuitively know that varroa mites have a role to play in culling weak colonies.

So there are some nuggets of pure sh*te in there aswell (he would view your OA sublimation with absolute horror)

Overall though, definitely worth a read. Not sure the super-deep frames have much relevance in the UK's climate though, certainly not for colonies in poly hives.
Yes Lazutin was blessed uniquely living in the Kaluga region. Of course he didn't believe in feeding either but relented in certain circumstances. The size of his hives and frames are also well worth noting. We might find the frames “super deep”, he arrived at the size for the wintering benefits. The principle seems sound to me though. If he was still with us I am sure his ideas would continue to (quote) “shake up the thinking of the independent minded beekeepers in North America and Europe”.
 

Boston Bees 

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We might find the frames “super deep”, he arrived at the size for the wintering benefits. The principle seems sound to me though.
Yes, as you say, he got to the depth (42cm ish) based on 25cm of cluster diameter and 18cm of honey to work through over winter (1mm per day for 6 months). Perfectly logical for his frozen region. Not 100% sure what benefit people in Spain, France, or even England get from Layens hives though. But what do I know, I haven't tried one.
 
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Murox 

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Yes, as you say, he got to the depth (42cm ish) based on 25cm of cluster diameter and 18cm of honey to work through over winter (1mm per day for 6 months). Perfectly logical for his frozen region. Not 100% sure what benefit people in Spain, France, or even England get from Layens hives though. But what do I know, I haven't tried one.
Well the deeper frames seem to work well enough in a "long" hive. I've been using ERB frames, basically dadant size turned on end, for the last 3 years. The bees certainly have wintered well on them and make big colonies. As with probably all "long" hives actual honey production seems to be less than in a vertical system, but they provide a surplus for me even up here in a wet windy green desert region.
As to the benefits, Georges de Layens emphasised sustainable beekeeping using local bees and keeping them in appropriate hives that required minimal management. He spent decades developing and perfecting the hive; and a system that enables management of colonies reliably with two or three hive visits per year. Guess it all depends upon your goals and priorities.
 

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