Collapsed super comb with wired foundation: bottom wire lugs nailed?

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Joined
Jan 24, 2018
Messages
273
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162
Location
Bosham, W. Sussex
Hive Type
14x12
Number of Hives
4+
With runny honey (not crystallised) I've had several super combs collapse during extraction, even with the extractor running at low speed. It was hot so the wax was soft, but there was no collapse with my foundationless frames which have a vertical central wooden stick. The problem is that the wire in the foundation pulls out of the bottom bar as it isn't fixed there which, as far as I know, nobody does.

Fixing the wire in the bottom frame is tricky as the nail needs to be put through near the bottom of the the bar to hold the wire tight enough and then there is a risk of the wood splitting.
 
To secure the bottom wire you could use a staple gun to put a staple through the wire loop into the bottom bar..
 
I was taught not to secure the bottom as the foundation will sag down with the weight of bees and comb as they build. I have never had a problem spinning SN1 or DN4
 
With runny honey (not crystallised) I've had several super combs collapse during extraction, even with the extractor running at low speed. It was hot so the wax was soft, but there was no collapse with my foundationless frames which have a vertical central wooden stick. The problem is that the wire in the foundation pulls out of the bottom bar as it isn't fixed there which, as far as I know, nobody does.

Fixing the wire in the bottom frame is tricky as the nail needs to be put through near the bottom of the the bar to hold the wire tight enough and then there is a risk of the wood splitting.
How fast are you spinning the extractor? Maybe your low speed isn't low enough
 
Staple gun with tiny nails works great, just be sure to have the other side bottom bar braced against a block of wood. Aim slightly upwards so it doesn't split. I put two through the bottom and have never had a problem.

I don't like the thought of really warm wax just hanging from the top with bees on it, especially when they start filling it. Although hopefully by then they've started sticking the sides down.

The heads of the wee nails stick up enough too that you can grab them with a set of pliers to pull them out, or just pry the bars apart.
 
Its the wired ones that fail for me while the FL ones seem to be more robust.
Perhaps the bamboo doesn't act like cheesewire.
This year for the first time we had to harvest early because theres OSR around in the area (probably Putin's fault)
Got everything really warmed in advance and didn't have any trouble until I gave the last super a final blast at top speed once empty and had a pair of new wired frames burst.
 
I was taught not to secure the bottom as the foundation will sag down with the weight of bees and comb as they build. I have never had a problem spinning SN1 or DN4
Exactly!!!
 
I was taught not to secure the bottom as the foundation will sag down with the weight of bees and comb as they build. I have never had a problem spinning SN1 or DN4
:iagree: never come across this phenomenon and I put wired and unwired frames through the extractor without any thought to treat any differently - had very few frames burst in the extractor over the years, but I can't see that starting a ridiculous fad with nailing/stapling the wires to the bottom bars would solve anything (in fact, I can't find anything that needs solving!)
 
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Your not suppose too nail bottom wires
 
We were too enthusiastic extracting our very first crop. Damaged a few of our fresh lovely comb, thankfully sound advice from this forum about the speed, hasn't happened since
 
Tangential or radial extractor?
 
Try balancing the combs better in the extractor and sounds like you need slower speeds, if tangential rotate frame faces a couple of times so one only removes the honey partly form each side to help balance the force on the combs.
Pollen in super combs can cause breakage if not careful spinning them.
 
Had my first frame break yesterday ironically , that's the first in over 40 years.
 

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