Can anyone help please?

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enrico 

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Three choices. The third is to seal them in.
If a pest control company sends someone round, they must seal the entrance in any case as otherwise the poison they use could be taken to other bees' nests by robbers after the remaining honey.

Remember donnaleck, bees are not there to cause you harm and just want to about their business rearing their young - just as we do. They are unlikely to sting you for no reason and to see bees in the garden is a welcome sight. If you are worried, don't flap your arms about to shoo them away but just walk away calmly. Occasionally a colony will be bad-tempered but this is a rare event.
I hate that action although it is an option. Where does the honey go? Ants?
 

Boston Bees 

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Solitary - individual entrances.
Not necessarily. I have seen mason bees using a common entrance into a tiled roof cavity. When they got inside they were presumably finding individual crevices. Householder was understandably sure that they were honey bees.

But I imagine that the OP does have honey bees in this case.
 

Ian123 

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I’ve seen an old garden wall that at a distance I thought was a swarm, I had to get very close to realise it was solitary bees and I’ve had them a while.
 

B+. 

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I think we're all missing the point here that the OP is terrified of these insects flying into holes in her wall. Without sounding alarmist or attempting to worry her further, this is something that will not go away by itself. It will get worse as the season progresses, possibly even resulting in swarms that come to inhabit other areas.
It's easy for us, with our familiarity with honeybees, to take a phobia lightly. I don't. My youngest son is terrified of any flying insect and will stay indoors all summer to avoid the risk of being stung. Those of you who know a little of my family history will understand that this is not an irrational fear.
The truth is: few beekeepers are able to remove brickwork to remove the bees then replace the bricks properly. We're just not trained as bricklayers so we shouldn't pretend that we're able to remove them without causing damage which the homeowner would have to correct.
My advice would be: Buy a can, or two, of expanding foam wasp nest destroyer. Wait until evening and spray the whole can into the hole. It expands like shaving foam and will fill the cavity inside. It smells a little like petrol and will kill any insect it touches. Any comb left inside may be a problem but since it is coated with an insecticide, I don't see it being the problem (ants) that others think it would be. I would seal up the hole and call it "job done".
 

Gilberdyke John 

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Solitary - individual entrances.
From the followingarticle
In some species, multiple females share a common nest, but each makes and provisions her own cells independently. This type of group is called ‘communal’ and is not uncommon. The primary advantage appears to be that a nest entrance is easier to defend from predators and parasites when there are multiple females using that same entrance on a regular basis.
 

donnaleck 

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Thank you or helping everyone. I tried to get pictures yesterday but obviously I couldn't get close enough. I haven't seen tonnes to be honest but they do dissappear inside quick. I will keep trying to get a photo if not I will ask my sister since I just can't do it. They don't seem to be aggressive of I'm honest as they don't seem to come near us when we are outside ( not that I like being out there now haha) I think i will leave them alone for a couple of weeks and if they are still there then I know i have a problem. I just don't like the though of destroying them but if they are honey bees then i know i have to do something :(.
 
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