Quantcast

bees being thrown out of hive

Beekeeping Forum

Help Support Beekeeping Forum:

barry 

New Bee
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
Location
colchester, essex
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3
Being a newbee I'm slightly puzzled by something I witnessed yesterday whilst putting some apigard into the hive. I noticed that a few times a worker would drag out a bee from the entrance and then fall to the ground grappling with it. Every time I saw this happen the bee that was being evicted was still alive, is this normal behaviour as I assumed they would only drag out dead bees or drones. Could they be taking out robber bees or bees that are diseased. There did'nt seem to be anything wrong with the evictee bees, in fact one of them looked like a newly emerged youngster.
 

barry 

New Bee
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
Location
colchester, essex
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3
the colony is seemingly strong and healthy so if robbing is going on they should be able to deal with it should'nt they ? do I need to keep a close eye on them to make sure its not getting out of hand
 

MJBee 

Drone Bee
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
1,818
Reaction score
0
Location
Dordogne 24360 France
Hive Type
commercial
Number of Hives
16 a mix of Commercial, National, 14 x 12, Dadant and a Warre
If you have not already done so close the entrance down to about 3", this will allow the colony to defend its self (if it is being robbed) and also improve the effectiveness of the Apiguard treatment.
 

barry 

New Bee
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
Location
colchester, essex
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3
Thanks for the advice, the entrance is already about 3 inches so should be ok
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2010
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
0
Location
Dartmoor edge, uk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
5...2 wooden National, 2 poly Nat & 1 poly nuc...bursting at the seams
Or they could be kicking out the drones?
 
Joined
May 29, 2010
Messages
6,214
Reaction score
0
Location
Norwich
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3 National Hives & 1 Observation Hive.(Indoors) & lots of empty boxes..
Take a close look at all the ones that have been chucked out and should be walking away from the hive, and you should see (as in my case) that they are all drones.....bee-smillie
 
Joined
Jun 8, 2010
Messages
2,374
Reaction score
0
Location
Dartmoor edge, uk
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
5...2 wooden National, 2 poly Nat & 1 poly nuc...bursting at the seams
Oh, sorry - seceral of my books say that the eviction process can be quite violent...I bow to experience...
 

barry 

New Bee
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
Location
colchester, essex
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3
None of the bees I've have seen thrown out have been drones, they are all workers, we still have a fair few drones in the colony so I don't suppose it will be long before we see them being kicked out
 

CB008 

House Bee
Joined
Apr 7, 2010
Messages
156
Reaction score
0
Location
Guildford, Surrey
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
4
Bees being ejected

Whilst I am not an experienced beekeeper, I have had experience for many weeks of what you have reported. Since I took in a swarm I have had a horrible varroa problem which I have been just about controlling and this has caused deformed wing virus and other non perfect bees. These are ejected as soon as they are discovered; indeed some are grappled out, fall to the ground and are then carried away in the air to be dropped away from the hive. Whilst the dwv’s are obvious to spot, some of the bees look normal to me. My belief is that the bees know instantly when any bee born is not 100% and these they eject. Could it be that this is what is happening with yours.
Once I discovered the Varroa I treated with everything from icing sugar to Hiveclean and now have thousands dropping under Apiguard.
 

oliver90owner 

Queen Bee
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
15,628
Reaction score
26
Location
Lincolnshire
Hive Type
14x12
CB008,

.....a swarm I have had a horrible varroa problem.....

You are experienced in this now. A lot, or most, new beeks fall into that trap. BTDT.

In future you will treat all swarms for varroa as soon as you get them? No capped brood for a period means there are a few days to knock them off with almost any treatment (apart from apistan or bayvarol, dependent on mite resistance, unless you 'finish the course of treatment') you care to choose.

Mite drop, and removal of the first capped brood (an important operation) and 'forking' out some pupae will indicate the level of the possible infestation.

As the olde saying goes, 'a stitch in time saves nine'.

Hope this helps you, and a few other new beeks, in the future.

Regards, RAB
 

barry 

New Bee
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
Messages
83
Reaction score
0
Location
colchester, essex
Hive Type
national
Number of Hives
3
I'm wondering if the varroa are the problem like you say and that the workers know instinctively that a newly emerged bee is not right. We have been monitoring the varroa since we got the colony early july. We were pleased because we did'nt seem to have much of a varroa problem, then last week there seemed to be a sudden explosion when we did a count. Hence we have started treating with apiguard. We have joined bee base and I think will get in touch with local bee inspector to see if we are going about things in the correct way
 

Latest posts

Top