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White set honey

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wannaBkeeper 

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Can anyone tell me how to make the white set honey as i have seen in my local supermarket.? The jars only say set honey on the label.

Regards

Dave
 

Cazza 

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Can anyone tell me how to make the white set honey as i have seen in my local supermarket.? The jars only say set honey on the label.

Regards

Dave
It's easy. Place hives next to OSR. Collect/extract,jar up, leave.

White honey.
Done!

Cazza
 

theengraver 

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Or if you dont just happen to have a field of OSR next door
creamed honey is the answer
•Creamed honey is really just honey that has been crystallized with very fine, tiny crystals. It makes the honey thicker and changes the way it feels in your mouth. It doesn't change any of the nutritional properties of honey at all. Start by getting yourself some really good local honey. A farmer's market is probably the best place to get it so you can support your local beekeeper. You'll also need to get a small quantity of creamed honey to "seed" your batch. If your (supposed to be) liquid honey is crystallized, you'll have to melt the crystals before you start. Just put the honey jar in water in a pot on the stove and heat it slowly for a while. Doesn't need to be boiling, just hot.

•2Now, we measure. We're going to mix the liquid honey and the creamed honey at a ratio of 9 parts liquid honey to 1 part creamed honey. This means if you got a quart of liquid honey, you'll need to mix in 7 tablespoons (or a little less than 1/2 cup) of creamed honey. We figure that out like this: a quart has four cups, a cup has 16 tablespoons, so a quart has 64 tablespoons. Divide that by 9 (use a calculator!) gives you 7.11111 tablespoons, but just "7" is accurate enough.

•3So, we got the liquid honey and the creamed honey in the bowl. Take your cordless drill and fit the electric mixer beater in the chuck. Mix your honey thoroughly at low speed. Takes a bit of doing, but it's gotta be bended really well. Now, I use a cordless drill to do the mixing, but it's not strictly necessary. Honey is stiff stuff, though, so your cake batter mixer won't be too happy trying to mix it. If you don't use the drill, you'll probably be best doing it by hand with what I call a whip, you might call it a wisk or egg beater. It helps if the honey is warm and soft.

•4Once the honey is mixed, put it in your containers. Wide jars or plastic containers work well. They'll need tight-fitting lids. I use small (pint) jars or plastic tubs so I can share my creamed honey with friends.

•5Now, you take your packaged honey and find a place cool to store it for a few weeks. The perfect temperature is 55 degrees (F), so that's a bit warmer than the refrigerator. It's gotta stay that cool the whole time, though, so if you don't have a place that stays at that temperature you can do like we do and put it in the refrigerator. It works fine, but takes a bit longer. I can't tell you how long, but 2-3 weeks is usual for us here.

•6When is it done? Well, you know it's done when you tip the container and the honey sits there, solid, hard. Get a spoon and taste it. I love the stuff, but a little goes a long way. Once it's set, you can store it at room temperatures, long as it doesn't get too warm-like over 90 degrees (F). If your kitchen is cold in the winter and your honey gets crystallized, this creamed honey won't do that-because it's already crystallized!
 

wannaBkeeper 

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Thanks to you all inc. Cazza, made me laugh.:laughing-smiley-014

As usual my bees like to keep me on my toes and have decided to produce 20lbs of unexpected honey. I was just looking at doing something different with the excess.

Regards

Dave
 
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