Monitoring Hives

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Darryl 

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I believe the OP is talking about placing a passive small device, not opening up the hive (unless I understand this wrong). If so, nothing wrong with that IMO. Could help (if placed correctly) identifying broodless period/s during winter (for OA treatment) for example.
I have installed a cheap temperature/humidity sensor set in the crownboard of each hive. I am unsure of the accuracy as they are not in the centre of the brrod but above it, but readings can be compared with those taken during the summer. The main purpose is to spot temperature changes during winter without disturbing the hive. It uses a phone app and works by bluetooth (only I catch the chill standing outside the hive). These are probably similar sensors to those OP uses.
 

understanding_bees 

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They cannot drink condensation water from walls, like many say/know.
Finman has told us that bees do not use condensation moisture from the walls of their hives. Is this information really true? Are there any members of this forum who are able to advise factually an answer to this question? Do bees use condensation moisture from inside their hives, or not?
 

Finman 

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Finman has told us that bees do not use condensation moisture from the walls of their hives. Is this information really true? Are there any members of this forum who are able to advise factually an answer to this question? Do bees use condensation moisture from inside their hives, or not?
And you are resolving this kind issue by voting?
In Australia, In UK or in Finland?

In Finland inner hives are so cold in winter, that a bee cannot leave the cluster and walk to drink water from the wall. And to which direction the bee chould go?

In the UK winter is so mild that bees can go out every now and then and pick water outside.
 

Erichalfbee 

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Finman has told us that bees do not use condensation moisture from the walls of their hives. Is this information really true? Are there any members of this forum who are able to advise factually an answer to this question? Do bees use condensation moisture from inside their hives, or not?
In Finland I expect the hive walls are frozen inside. Finny has reported so before. He us talking about his bees and his experience.
 

understanding_bees 

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And you are resolving this kind issue by voting?
In Australia, In UK or in Finland?

In Finland inner hives are so cold in winter, that a bee cannot leave the cluster and walk to drink water from the wall. And to which direction the bee chould go?

In the UK winter is so mild that bees can go out every now and then and pick water outside.
To Finman, and anyone else who has an interest in this subject of condensation, and drinking water for bees.

I am not trying to ask tricky questions, I am not wanting endless debates. I must confess that I had not been thinking of condensation freezing on the inside of the hive walls in Finland. In this regard I can sympathise with Finman's difficulties in a very cold winter. And I am certainly not asking for people to vote.

I would hope to find a simple, straightforward answer to what I thought was a straightforward question, namely, "Do bees use condensation moisture from inside their hives, or not? ".

Perhaps the answer might be, in very cold climates where the condensation moisture can freeze - the answer seems to be "No".

But what about more temperate climates? Does anybody know? Or is it all just speculation?
 

Beebe 

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Somehow it's escalated to seven.
To Finman, and anyone else who has an interest in this subject of condensation, and drinking water for bees.

I am not trying to ask tricky questions, I am not wanting endless debates. I must confess that I had not been thinking of condensation freezing on the inside of the hive walls in Finland. In this regard I can sympathise with Finman's difficulties in a very cold winter. And I am certainly not asking for people to vote.

I would hope to find a simple, straightforward answer to what I thought was a straightforward question, namely, "Do bees use condensation moisture from inside their hives, or not? ".

Perhaps the answer might be, in very cold climates where the condensation moisture can freeze - the answer seems to be "No".

But what about more temperate climates? Does anybody know? Or is it all just speculation?
Even when a hive is in a climate where condensation might become frozen, the temperature inside all parts of the hive will not always be sub-zero.
It seems un-bee-like to ignore the most straightforward way to do something....risk death outside or move a few centimetres to get water.
The Finnish experience is exceptional in this regard.
 

Finman 

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....risk death outside or move a few centimetres to get water.
The Finnish experience is exceptional in this regard.
Normally NO bees overwinter between the frame and the wall. But a lot condensation happens in that gap, and condensation moisture goes into the frame too, if the frame has uncapped syrup . Or into pollen and it makes mold.

There is no such distances like "few centimetres" in the hive. A bee must go around the frames. It route is tens of centimeters.

Shortes way is around the top bar, and it is warmest route then, when out temp is mild and the cluster expands.

Actually in bad frost the cluster is not a ball. It is a sliced cake with layers of bees and wax combs. There are times when the layers of bees do not have connection to each other. If food is finish in one seem, the bees will die and drop down to floor.

Yes, bees will not die lack of water in the hive. I have not met such.

If it is 2-3 months very cold outside under -20C, those bee slices may drod down a few. And it is lack of sugar then in the middle of cluster.

You may research things in your conditions in the country. There is not much idea to know what all happen around the world.

.
 
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Finman 

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Even when a hive is in a climate where condensation might become frozen, the temperature inside all parts of the hive will not always be sub-zero.
If it at least one time sub zero, bees are then all dead.

A living cluster has about 23C temp and edges are about +10C. But you will find all this from google. If the colony has brood, inside, temp is 35C.

When you are going to measure all this yourself, you have plenty of work to reviele out such, which all is in the Google..
 

Beebe 

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Somehow it's escalated to seven.
If it at least one time sub zero, bees are then all dead.

A living cluster has about 23C temp and edges are about +10C. But you will find all this from google. If the colony has brood, inside, temp is 35C.

When you are going to measure all this yourself, you have plenty of work to reviele out such, which all is in the Google..
We were discussing hive wall temperatures as they affect water. You don't need to tell me that freezing kills bees. But thankyou for your wisdom.
 

Beebe 

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Somehow it's escalated to seven.
You may research things in your conditions in the country. There is not much idea to know what all happen around the world.

.
So stop telling me then.
 

victor meldrew 

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I agree with Dani, the cluster needs to be maintained, if it is brocken by disturbing the natural rhythm of the hive then the heat is lost the both bees and larvae will die. To state the obvious maybe.
Very little larvae present in the depth of winter . However I leave well alone .
after all there is very little you can do outside of popping some fondant on the crown board.
 

Ian123 

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However I leave well alone .
after all there is very little you can do outside of popping some fondant on the crown board.
No you don’t give them fondant it’s fondant substitute sugar bricks you need to use. 😇
 
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