Leg jiggling: is it a male-only phenomenon? An observational study in an airport café.

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Amari

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We got to Nice airport with two hours to spare so sat in a caff. A man on a nearby table was intermittently jiggling either one or both legs at a rate too rapid to count - maybe about 4/second. If he made arm movements, eg raising a cup, the movements might stop but speaking to his companion made no difference. SWMBO and I both agreed that this phenomenon is quite commonly seen in males but we couldn't recollect seeing it in females - a gender difference which is not recorded in my Google search for 'leg jiggling' (my dwindling knowledge as a retired medic suggests that leg jiggling is not a recognised 'disease' unless one invokes the label 'psychogenic tic').
Being retired expands the opportunities to people-watch. Our previous study, conducted from a park bench in Malaga, investigated the gender-occurrence of abnormal gaits: a small preponderance of men.
 
maybe it was the pilot..i have restless leg syndrome.sometimes i wish i could chop them off....
 
We got to Nice airport with two hours to spare so sat in a caff. A man on a nearby table was intermittently jiggling either one or both legs at a rate too rapid to count - maybe about 4/second. If he made arm movements, eg raising a cup, the movements might stop but speaking to his companion made no difference. SWMBO and I both agreed that this phenomenon is quite commonly seen in males but we couldn't recollect seeing it in females - a gender difference which is not recorded in my Google search for 'leg jiggling' (my dwindling knowledge as a retired medic suggests that leg jiggling is not a recognised 'disease' unless one invokes the label 'psychogenic tic').
Being retired expands the opportunities to people-watch. Our previous study, conducted from a park bench in Malaga, investigated the gender-occurrence of abnormal gaits: a small preponderance of men.
The abnormal gaits is more balanced for sure. There are leaning gaits, wobbly gaits, backward gaits, bent gaits, sliding gaits, old gaits, swinging (gates)...you get the idea. As you walk along with your wife, try to think up and enact as many as you can as it makes great and enjoyable exercise. ;)
 
The abnormal gaits is more balanced for sure. There are leaning gaits, wobbly gaits, backward gaits, bent gaits, sliding gaits, old gaits, swinging (gates)...you get the idea. As you walk along with your wife, try to think up and enact as many as you can as it makes great and enjoyable exercise. ;)
She observes my creaking gait.......
https://www.oxfordreference.com/display/10.1093/oi/authority.20110803095646473#:~:text=Usually meaning that someone who,sometimes used instead of door.
 
i have been taking pramipexole..for a while .does help me sleep .i was told about herb that helps but can not remember what it was...
thanks for your tips....
 
@Amari
It is a curse which most medics suffer from. People watching and then diagnosing anything abnormal. My old anatomy professor hated the term "abnormal " and whenever we showed him a bit of abnormal anatomy in the cadaver dissection would say " it is a normal variation".
I agree, leg jiggling is a male only phenomenon.
 
Have you ever tried to copy it?
He must have had very flexible and stretchy hammys.
I thought everyone copied it, I certainly did when I was lithe and supple. These days I would probably just wobble over, unlike weebles which wobble but don't fall downo_O
 
Does it count if you jiggle someone else's leg?

James
Sounds as though you have personal experience so please tell us more. We didn't observe that phenomenon in our study but would consider a video as an add-on.......;)🦵
 

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