Is this mould?

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understanding_bees 

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Landing boards are solely for the benefit of the beekeeper, not the bees
Who was it that said that you might get multiple different answers to a question, because beekeepers do not agree with each other?
Just because you make an assertion that "Landing boards are solely for the benefit of the beekeeper, not the bees" does not prove your point.
The bees in my hives have voted with their feet!!
 

drdrday 

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I really don't understand some beekeepers' reasons for being so negative whenever a landing board is mentioned. The most anyone can say is that the bees don't need them. I've yet to hear, and certainly can't think of, any way in which the use of a landing board would have negative consequences on the bees.
It's obviously a personal choice, but some beekeepers benefit from having landing boards. I know I do.
I suppose a lot of it is down to how you keep bees. If you're a hobby keeper with a couple of hives in the garden then you usually want to take the time observing your bees regularly and the additional couple of quid for a landing board is negligible.
I can understand, if not like, the way that some beekeepers judge others on the many choices we all make that directly affect the bees but it's scraping the barrel to pick up on someone's choice about a landing board 🙄
 

Curly green finger's 

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I really don't understand some beekeepers' reasons for being so negative whenever a landing board is mentioned. The most anyone can say is that the bees don't need them. I've yet to hear, and certainly can't think of, any way in which the use of a landing board would have negative consequences on the bees.
It's obviously a personal choice, but some beekeepers benefit from having landing boards. I know I do.
I suppose a lot of it is down to how you keep bees. If you're a hobby keeper with a couple of hives in the garden then you usually want to take the time observing your bees regularly and the additional couple of quid for a landing board is negligible.
I can understand, if not like, the way that some beekeepers judge others on the many choices we all make that directly affect the bees but it's scraping the barrel to pick up on someone's choice about a landing board 🙄
Not just hobbests ;).
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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If horizontal surfaces are so crucial to the bees, why are combs built in the vertical plane when, they (such as with melliponella bees) can just as easily be built in the horizontal? if you observed bees you will see that they can just as easily walk in a vertical plane, or even upside down. Bees have survived for millions of years without landing boards. This is just another example of anthropomorphism beating logic. Something else to make the beekeeper feel better for themselves.
If you want to have landing boards, fill your boots, but don't then make up some theory that they are 'better' for the bees and thus assume an air of superiority, implying that people who don't use them are doing their bees a disservice
 
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jenkinsbrynmair 

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If horizontal surfaces are so crucial to the bees, why are combs built in the vertical plane when, they (such as with melliponella bees) can just as easily be built in the horizontal? if you observed bees you will see that they can just as easily walk in a vertical plane, or even upside down. Bees have survived for millions of years without landing boards. This is just another example of anthropomorphism beating logic. Something else to make the beekeeper feel better for themselves.
If you want to have landing boards, fill your boots, but don't then make up some theorry that they are 'better' for the bees and thus assume an air of superiority, implying that people who don't use them are doing their bees a disservice
 

Erichalfbee 

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I have UFE so there is a built in landing board. It’s nice to watch bees on landing boards and that does benefit me. I doubt the bees care though
 

RogerIvy 

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Landing boards are solely for the benefit of the beekeeper, not the bees
I have two hives next to each other, one with landing board and one without. On a calm day it makes no difference - they're both busy. On a windy day the one with landing board carries on regardless. The hive without slows down dramatically. If it's a strong wind they virtually stop.
Of course this is not enough data to make it a statistically valid finding - just encourages me to build a landing board for the other hive.
 

Beebe 

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Somehow it's escalated to seven.
A landing board does seem to help them when they're well-loaded or it's windy. What would happen in a natural nest is irrelevant when discussing something unnatural in so many ways as is a hive.

I'm not sure if the board gives them somewhere to receive nectar and defend against robbing bees or whether it's the opposite and actually gives them an extra area to defend which is easier for robbers to access.

On balance, I like them.
 

Swarm 

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A landing board does seem to help them when they're well-loaded or it's windy. What would happen in a natural nest is irrelevant when discussing something unnatural in so many ways as is a hive.

I'm not sure if the board gives them somewhere to receive nectar and defend against robbing bees or whether it's the opposite and actually gives them an extra area to defend which is easier for robbers to access.

On balance, I like them.
Some people need to remember that point.
 

GuyNir 

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Each to their own, but…

On any given day, but especially on windy days and when there’s a heavy flow on - if I look at two colonies, one with a landing board and one without, it’s very clear the landing board is indeed beneficial. just comparing the no. of bees missing the entrance, ending up on the ground/grass and having to attempt this again. So, I feel that under some circumstances, having no landing board might slow them down a bit. My opinion, other will probably disagree and that’s OK.
 

RogerIvy 

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I'm not sure if the board gives them somewhere to receive nectar and defend against robbing bees or whether it's the opposite and actually gives them an extra area to defend which is easier for robbers to access.
Interesting question!
 

hemo 

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A hives vertical surface presents enough grip for a bees to adhere to, most of this talk about benefitting the bee is as said, is more to appease the beekeeper in his choice.
 
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RogerIvy 

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A hives vertical surface presents enough grip for a bees to adhere to too, most of this talk about benefitting the bee is as said, is more to appease the beekeeper in his choice.
Except that on a windy day my hive without landing board reduces activity significantly, and if the wind is strong and gust enough they stop flying out altogether. Maybe different bees, or maybe they find it too difficult to land.
 

GuyNir 

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I’ll have a word with my bees then. Failing that, they’ll be going back to flying school.

I only currently have one colony without a landing board, will fix that next year.
 

BBC 

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I do love reading these posts. I keep my fingers tied up at all times to curb my inexperience.
you’ve just gone from the possibility of mould to crash landing.
I treat my hives with oil because I love the finish. I have dirty feet on my landing board and no landing board on the other hive. I wanted to see the difference. I can’t, but I’m a newbee and it’s been the least of my concerns as a first year student!
Cedar doesn’t need to be treated it’s true. However, it will last longer if you do. The surface oils will be less likely to dry out and draw oil from deeper in. Repeat oil will also benefit structural integrity and aesthetics without doubt.
As for crash landing bees, it’s one of the wonders I too have witnessed.
Isn’t this an amazing past time.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Cedar doesn’t need to be treated it’s true. However, it will last longer if you do.
How long is 'longer' ? and how much is less? I've seen untreated cedar boxes made before the second World War, still going strong.
 

BBC 

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How long is 'longer' ? and how much is less? I've seen untreated cedar boxes made before the second World War, still going strong.
I have no doubt that you have. I’ve seen cedar that has deteriorated and needed replacing in less than five years. Albeit not on a hive. But similarly exposed to the elements.
 

Swarm 

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I agree,
I’ll have a word with my bees then. Failing that, they’ll be going back to flying school.

I only currently have one colony without a landing board, will fix that next year.
My stands used to have a plank fixed to the front that acted as a landing board, all hive fronts butted up to it.
 

Wilco 

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I have UFE so there is a built in landing board. It’s nice to watch bees on landing boards and that does benefit me. I doubt the bees care though
I'd wondered about putting a hinged board on the bottom of the UFE, extending the landing area for those who want it but also could be flapped/folded up for moving the hives between sites.
 

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