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Huge difference in water content

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enrico 

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Enrico....I know your question was about the big difference between the top of the tank reading and the bottom, but I'm intrigued about such high readings in your capped honey and the suspense is too much for me:unsure:. Do you have an idea as to what the nectar source was?
I can't be absolutely sure. We had an amazing blackberry flow, an acre of borage down the road, a tree full of lime, the horse chestnut went crazy! I have never seen so much blossom as this year. We are getting 10lbs of apple windfalls a day the tree is so laden with apples. There has rarely been a day when the bees have not been able to fly!
The interesting thing is that the honey is quite medium brown and so so runny. Impossible on a knife, but that might be the heat!
E
 

ericbeaumont 

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To be absolutely sure of no fermentation water content needs to be 17 or less. Between 17 and 20 the likelihood of fermentation depends on the yeast level. Over 20%, there is always a danger of fermentation independent of the yeast level. Hence 20% does seem a logical level.
I agree with you, Drex, and don't sell anything at 19 or over; even at 18.8 I sell it first and worry a little, though I've only had two reports of funny honey in six years. Mixing 19+ with a lower % honey works but there are times when it separates in the jar later.

In the end I find it easier to save the worry and sell 19+ as Bakers' because there's a demand for it and I get £18/kg (£8/lb) for a plastic tub at market.
 

beeno 

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I have often found that capped honey has a higher water content than uncapped on the same frame. It is in the literature as well. I only extract as I take frames off, on a hot day in a hot kitchen and clingfilm the honey bucket.
 

beeno 

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Over 20%, there is always a danger of fermentation independent of the yeast level.
Hence 20% does seem a logical level.
17% would be a logical level as osmophillic yeast cannot cause fermentation at that level!
 

drex 

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17% would be a logical level as osmophillic yeast cannot cause fermentation at that level!
Then I would be broke. In this part of the country, with my bees I have never had honey with that low a moisture level. Only ever had one bucket ferment
 

drdrday 

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Then I would be broke. In this part of the country, with my bees I have never had honey with that low a moisture level. Only ever had one bucket ferment
Same here. My honey seems to be a consistent 18-18.5%, spring or summer.
 

Antipodes 

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I've noticed a big difference in viscosity between 17 and 19 per cent. There is the running off the knife issue like Enrico mentions but there is a big difference in the inverted jar bubble test too.
 

Amari 

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I've noticed a big difference in viscosity between 17 and 19 per cent. There is the running off the knife issue like Enrico mentions but there is a big difference in the inverted jar bubble test too.
What's that please?
 

enrico 

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I think he means the speed a bubble travels from one end of the jar to the other! But a Greek will do if you have one handy
 

MuswellMetro 

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i have just extracted three fully capped supers of lime and by refractor and hydrometer at 21c (70f) the water content was 21%, I placed the buckets in a warming cabinet at 40c for two days, (lids off and gauze over tops) and the water content reduced to 18.5%
 

Suzi 

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I've often wondered if we could use a dehydrating cabinet, the sort used to make biltong for example, to help evaporate some of the excess moisture.

Has anyone tried this?
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Apparently Welsh has it's origins in Northern England
Welsh stems from Brythonic (hence the name 'Britain') the language of the original inhabitants of the British isles. way before there even was an England - or Engerlund as it was first called (so, the modern shaven headed knuckle draggers got something right 😁 ) when the saxon hordes first came over and squatted in the Eastern provinces the Brythonic tribes were pushed North and West so what is now known as Cumbria, Northumbria and the North Western counties of modern 'England' and southern Scotland became known as the 'Old North' by the indigenous Brythonic (later Welsh) tribes. Cornwall and the South West became the old South and, where many tribes decided to move near their ancient tribal lands across the water to what the Romans called Armorica in Western France it became known as 'Little Britain' and was recorded as such up until the Tudor period and later when the name changed to Brittany
 

Erichalfbee 

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I've often wondered if we could use a dehydrating cabinet, the sort used to make biltong for example, to help evaporate some of the excess moisture.

Has anyone tried this?
Without having recourse to a professional honey dryer there are things you can do. Honey is fairly easy to dry if it remains in the frames. Abelo do a neat supers warming heater that does the job nicely. You just stack the supers up on the element and leave them for a day or so. Failing that a small room with supers stacked up and a fan blowing upwards works with a dehumidifier. I've done both.
 

jenkinsbrynmair 

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Without having recourse to a professional honey dryer there are things you can do. Honey is fairly easy to dry if it remains in the frames. Abelo do a neat supers warming heater that does the job nicely. You just stack the supers up on the element and leave them for a day or so. Failing that a small room with supers stacked up and a fan blowing upwards works with a dehumidifier. I've done both.
:iagree: Although I don't get much use out of mine (impulse buy) so I might sell it on as it's taking up too much valuable space 😁
 

enrico 

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i have just extracted three fully capped supers of lime and by refractor and hydrometer at 21c (70f) the water content was 21%, I placed the buckets in a warming cabinet at 40c for two days, (lids off and gauze over tops) and the water content reduced to 18.5%
Is that all the way down or the top inch!
 

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