How soon can you re-site a colony back to original apiary

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Joined
Sep 13, 2011
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Location
Somerset
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I took a nuc from a hive last weekend (now 4 days ago . It's as busy as can be as I made sure it had plenty of bees but removed it from the apiary and took it home hence the flying bees too. Not certain if the queen is in the nuc or the parent colony as I did not see/find her. However I am off for a few days and as a precaution against angst from a historically grumpy neighbour I'd like to move them back to the apiary. My question is this. After just 5-6 days will they have forgotten their previous hive position and start from scratch and re-orientate themselves to its future new position without remembering where they were before and lose the flying bees back to the parent colony. Hope this is reasonably clear.
 
Might get some drift but they're probably fine. If it transpires the queen is in the hive, why not move the hive a foot or two sideways and put the nuc where the hive was.
 
Might get some drift but they're probably fine. If it transpires the queen is in the hive, why not move the hive a foot or two sideways and put the nuc where the hive was.
It is a long hive with 22 14x 12 frames absolutely rammed!! I cant get a crane near the apiary to shift it!!. An inspection of the nuc will clarify my thinking and actions by the end of the week. This question reinforces the old adage "ask10 beekeepers a question and you'll get 30 conflicting answers"!!! ie nothing definitive - you pays your money and you takes yer chance.
 
It is a long hive with 22 14x 12 frames absolutely rammed!! I cant get a crane near the apiary to shift it!!. An inspection of the nuc will clarify my thinking and actions by the end of the week. This question reinforces the old adage "ask10 beekeepers a question and you'll get 30 conflicting answers"!!! ie nothing definitive - you pays your money and you takes yer chance.
Slightly awkward then.
Personally I've not had too many issues on the couple of occasions I've had to do something similar with regards movement. However,, I'll also bow to the superior experience of other respondents.

You could always move a few more frames of nearly emerged brood to the nuc to create more space in the hive and simultaneously make up for potential lost numbers from drift in time, as long as they have enough stores in the nuc.
 
I took a nuc from a hive last weekend (now 4 days ago . It's as busy as can be as I made sure it had plenty of bees but removed it from the apiary and took it home hence the flying bees too. Not certain if the queen is in the nuc or the parent colony as I did not see/find her. However I am off for a few days and as a precaution against angst from a historically grumpy neighbour I'd like to move them back to the apiary. My question is this. After just 5-6 days will they have forgotten their previous hive position and start from scratch and re-orientate themselves to its future new position without remembering where they were before and lose the flying bees back to the parent colony. Hope this is reasonably clear.
Had this exact question posed to me Sunday. If we assume foraging lifespan in cool spring weather at 3 weeks, then 1/3 of the foragers you moved are dead, 1/3 are new and have never been to the old location. This leaves 1/3 as possible drifters.

An older gentleman here once told me to place a small limb from a sapling or shrub near the entrance with leaves intact. The idea was the muscle memory of crawling out the same hole would be broken if they needed to navigate through a few leaves to get out. You don’t block the entrance, just add a few obstacles they must go through.

He said it “resets their GPS”. 😂🐝

I have used this many times for slight moves in the same yard, or other scenarios.
 
Had this exact question posed to me Sunday. If we assume foraging lifespan in cool spring weather at 3 weeks, then 1/3 of the foragers you moved are dead, 1/3 are new and have never been to the old location. This leaves 1/3 as possible drifters.

An older gentleman here once told me to place a small limb from a sapling or shrub near the entrance with leaves intact. The idea was the muscle memory of crawling out the same hole would be broken if they needed to navigate through a few leaves to get out. You don’t block the entrance, just add a few obstacles they must go through.

He said it “resets their GPS”. 😂🐝

I have used this many times for slight moves in the same yard, or other scenarios.
Yep Hadn't thought of that one although was aware of the trick in another scenario.
 
I took a nuc from a hive last weekend (now 4 days ago . It's as busy as can be as I made sure it had plenty of bees but removed it from the apiary and took it home hence the flying bees too. Not certain if the queen is in the nuc or the parent colony as I did not see/find her. However I am off for a few days and as a precaution against angst from a historically grumpy neighbour I'd like to move them back to the apiary. My question is this. After just 5-6 days will they have forgotten their previous hive position and start from scratch and re-orientate themselves to its future new position without remembering where they were before and lose the flying bees back to the parent colony. Hope this is reasonably clear.
Three week’s minimum they say I’ve never tested it,but will it not depend on how many young bees you gave the nuc,lf you shook in lots of young bees you could leave in same site.but that would weaken the parent colony.l suppose it a decision,expansion or honey crop.l am beginning to wonder is this a expansion year.
 

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