Getting ready to swarm?

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Joined
Jul 19, 2022
Messages
69
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Location
Wiltshire
Hive Type
National
Number of Hives
3
This is my nasty hive and with this activity wasn’t terribly willing to dive in and have a look. Just in case. However … last week no obvious signs of queen cells. Queen evidently laying. But somewhat concerned by this activity (very busy). I demaree split last year successfully so would be happy to do that again if it’s not too late … images are of the back and front of the hive.
 

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I’ve not seen them there before either, unless they have created an entry space the rear is closed and has a tray. Currently a brood box and super there already. Could do without them swarming tbh. We have a friend racing in the GN (eek!) 😱 and would quite like to watch him rather than manage an already grumpy hive!
 
might be my eyes or the photo .but is the entrance blocked .it looks like something .as i say it might be my old age ..
 
Sensible thought. Wasn’t last week but will double check. Thank you - helpful suggestion. This is why I like this forum so much.
 
Any queens cells ? If not then not swarming if none seen.
Bees will only cluster like that if a clipped queen has tried to swarm and simply makes her way back to under the hive or the entrance is so busy with foragers and those taking orientaion flights that it becomes to congested.
Now and then when it is too hot the bees will beard/cluster outside .
If entrance is too small then with the nice weather the bees simply can't all come and go at will, they will cause a back log/jam and cause the entrance doesn't look to bad , simply opening it up to full size will tell you within twenty odd mins if that is the issue.
The bees at the rear could just be lookingfor another way in.
 
Bees on the rear could be a swarm that landed are bees hanging under the hive. Otherwise the queen may have gone walk about?
 
This is my nasty hive and with this activity wasn’t terribly willing to dive in and have a look. Just in case. However … last week no obvious signs of queen cells. Queen evidently laying. But somewhat concerned by this activity (very busy). I demaree split last year successfully so would be happy to do that again if it’s not too late … images are of the back and front of the hive.
I would be inclined to pop a piece of wood to leave a decent gap between floor and brood box at the back in case of a blockage. Like the idea of a lost queen . They may go in. I have used the wasp guard you have on (home made) for the last two autumns and winters with great success. Mine are off now but the entrances are small as they are all summer. My grandson had a swarm in a bait hive last year which went under the brood box and they took a long time to go in for some reason even with a few good nudges and encouragement!! Worth a try.
 
Bees on the rear could be a swarm that landed are bees hanging under the hive. Otherwise the queen may have gone walk about?
They have pollen on their legs too though.
There is a lot of pollen coming in. Wow!
 
This is my nasty hive and with this activity wasn’t terribly willing to dive in and have a look. Just in case. However … last week no obvious signs of queen cells. Queen evidently laying. But somewhat concerned by this activity (very busy). I demaree split last year successfully so would be happy to do that again if it’s not too late … images are of the back and front of the hive.
When you looked in last week, was there much room for the bees to store pollen? I don't usually see bees in a swarm or swarming bees carrying anything like that quantity of pollen.
Also, have you considered making the entrance wider?
 
When you looked in last week, was there much room for the bees to store pollen? I don't usually see bees in a swarm or swarming bees carrying anything like that quantity of pollen.
Also, have you considered making the entrance wider?
The entrance is now wider (now that I have managed to get my hands to it without the fury of the bees! They are a really nasty lot.) Queen now located, re-marked and in situ.
 
When you looked in last week, was there much room for the bees to store pollen? I don't usually see bees in a swarm or swarming bees carrying anything like that quantity of pollen.
Also, have you considered making the entrance wider?
Full inspection today. Plenty of pollen space and yes lots coming in. Queen found, re-marked and heart rate return to normal!
 
I would be inclined to pop a piece of wood to leave a decent gap between floor and brood box at the back in case of a blockage. Like the idea of a lost queen . They may go in. I have used the wasp guard you have on (home made) for the last two autumns and winters with great success. Mine are off now but the entrances are small as they are all summer. My grandson had a swarm in a bait hive last year which went under the brood box and they took a long time to go in for some reason even with a few good nudges and encouragement!! Worth a try.
I finally managed to get the vast majority in yesterday after Sutty's helpful thought. It took quite some time, they were extremely cross but gradual smoking got them up and over and in. Inspected today and queen found and duly marked. Top tip Sutty - thanks for that!
 
I finally managed to get the vast majority in yesterday after Sutty's helpful thought. It took quite some time, they were extremely cross but gradual smoking got them up and over and in. Inspected today and queen found and duly marked. Top tip Sutty - thanks for that!
She would only have tried to swarm if there were sealed queen cells present (there are rare exceptions), hopefully you checked for them?
 

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