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Fungi v bee viruses

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frankenstine 

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I chucked a load of old dead rotting tree and braches that was no good for fire wood through the wood chipper just to get it out the way and use for weed suppression. Have noticed quite a few of the bees on it.

there is a lot of fungi growing in and on it for the original idea is not really ideal but It really a problem ether and should have expected it chipping wood that a bit rotten in hindsight. Tho are the bees there for the fungi, the moisture who knows or why.
 

Swarm 

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I spread a load of fresh chipped wood/bark over an area and had the same thing, loads of little toadstools.
 

oxnatbees 

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Just remembered we had sulphonamides too for EFB and AFB. Also banned but effective. J'arrete ma valise!!
They only suppress the symptoms of AFB, they don't kill the pathogen. Some US States allow the use of antibiotics to suppress the symptoms without actually killing the disease, then due to migratory beekeepers it gets regularly spread back even into the states where such practises are not allowed.

Which is why AFB is endemic in America but almost extinct in Britain & Europe.

Also there were concerns about residues in honey which some humans were allergic to.

Regarding bees on fungi, and wood chippings, it is interesting but how do we know they are not simply using these as convenient damp drinking spots? They do the same with moss. Has anyone seen them gathering fungal spores?
 

ericbeaumont 

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Has anyone seen them gathering fungal spores?
There's research out there to suggest they do so either actively or incidentally: Here we investigated the effect of consumption of fungal spores on survival, ovarian activation and the development of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) in honey bee workers.

Another doc states: As noted by Shaw (1990), fungal spores could be a source of proteins, amino acids and steroids that may supplement nutritionally poor diets. In addition, they may have various colours and volatile compounds that may be attractive to bees.

Lot of mays in there.
 

Finman 

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Phil Chandler experimented with an "ECO Floor" for his TBH's with woodland detritus in the bottom which encouraged fungus growth.
Where it is proved that "forest floor" kills something bad inside bees. And it takes couple of days when bees carry out all rubbish from floor.

Childish thinking.
 

Finman 

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Another doc states: As noted by Shaw (1990), fungal spores could be a source of proteins,

Lot of mays in there.
[/QUOTE]

30 years ago.... where is the industrial solution? It is very difficult to get irradiated pollen nowadays.

What is wrong with soya protein or dry yeast?

Mushroom spores are highly allergic.
 

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